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Friday, 24 October 2014

Introduction

Sometimes when I get involved in a task I lose track of time. This can have really bad consequences if left unchecked such as forgetting to pick up my daughter from the bus stop or forgetting to take stuff out of the oven.

I am also the type of person that becomes so involved in their work that I can easily forget to stop for food and neglect to take breaks.

If I know I am going to be working from home I now set up a job to pop up a message at certain points in the day to remind me to do something.

To schedule tasks in Linux there are two useful tools that are worth knowing about:
  • at
  • cron
In this guide I am briefly going to touch upon these two commands and then I am going to show you the Everyday Linux User way which I find to be much easier.

Scheduling A Job To Occur Once Using at

The at command makes it possible to run a task in the future. For instance using the examples from my introduction I might want to set a task to run at 3 PM to remind me to pick up my daughter from the bus.

There are various tools for sending a message to the screen including xmessage which is very basic and the one I like to use which is kind of novel called xcowsay.

xcowsay displays a picture of a cow and the message you would like displayed within a speech bubble.


The syntax for the at command is as follows:

at <time>
> command

There are various ways to specify the time such as by specifying the hours and minutes or by specifying midnight, noon or teatime. You can specify to run the command today, tomorrow, in 5 days time or 5 weeks from now.

Here are a few examples for setting the time you want to run a scheduled task:

  • at 9:45 PM - runs command at 9:45 pm
  • at 10:00 AM - runs command at 10:00 am
  • at 9:30 PM tomorrow - runs command at 9:30 pm tomorrow
  • at 4:00 PM + 3 days - runs command 3 days from now at 4 pm
  • at 10:00 AM Jun 25 - runs command at 10 am on June 25th
The command element can be any command but to display output to the screen the command needs to know which screen to send it to.

Therefore to run a program such as xcowsay you would do the following:

at 11:00 PM
> export DISPLAY=:0 && xcowsay "Time for bed"

This command will run at 11 PM. The export display=:0 tells the job to display output to the screen and xcowsay displays the text "Time for bed" in a speech bubble coming from a cartoon cow.

The at command is useful if you want to run a command in the future only once.

If you want to see all the commands that are set to run in the future type atq

10 Fri Oct 24 22:09:00 2014 a gary

Of course the at command can be used for much more powerful things than just displaying messages. 

If you want to remove a scheduled task run the atrm <jobid>. The job id can be seen by running the atq command. The job ID is the number on the left.

Scheduling A Recurring Job Using cron

cron is useful for scheduling jobs that are to occur again and again.


For instance, if I work from home between Monday and Friday I might want to be notified when it is lunchtime and to schedule drinks breaks.

To schedule a task you have to use the crontab -e command which opens a file as follows:



The command in the above screenshot displays the message "Have lunch" every weekday at 12:30.

The timings look a bit weird when you first see them but basically from left to right they are:


  • Minutes
  • Hours
  • Day Of Month
  • Month
  • Day Of Week
If you look at the command in the screenshot again you will see it looks as follows:

30 12 * * 1-5 command

So the first number as shown by the key above is minutes. That means at 30 minutes past the hour the command specified is going to run.

If the command was 30 * * * * then the command would run 30 minutes past every hour on every day.

The second number in the key above is hours. That means that at 12:30 the command will run.

Again if the command was 30 12 * * * the command would run at 12:30 every day.

The third number is the day of the month. In the command above it is set to * which means every day.

The fourth value is the month. In the command above it is set to * which means every month. You can specify any month number between 1 and 12.

Finally the 5th number is the day of the week. Therefore if you want the command to run every Monday you specify 1.

As you can see my 5th number is set to 1-5. This means the command will run on every day between 1 and 5. (i.e. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday).

If you want a command to run every 5 minutes between 9 AM and 5 PM every day you would use the following syntax:

*/5 9-17 * * * command

The /n (where n is the number to skip by) means the command will run all the time but skip by the number specified by n. 

If you want to run a command at multiple times in the day you can use a comma to separate the times as follows:

5 12,15,18 * * * command

The above command will run at 12:05,  15:05 and 18:05.

Saving the file and exiting the program automatically updates cron and the events will start firing as and when they are supposed to.

Using corntab to schedule a task

The corntab website provides a visual crontab editor for helping to schedule cron jobs.

This makes it easier to add recurring jobs without remembering the rules from the previous section.

 
All you have to do is select each category (minute, hour, day of month, month and day of week) and visually select the values you are looking for. You can enter the command you want to run in a dedicated text box.

This provides you with the command that you need to paste into the crontab editor.


















As good as corntab is there is an even easier way to schedule tasks.

Schedule Tasks Using gnome-schedule
















The easiest way to schedule tasks is to use Gnome Schedule (gnome-schedule)

Gnome Schedule can be found within the package managers of most distributions.

When you run gnome-schedule a list of tasks will appear. The tasks can be one-off tasks or recurring.

To add a new task click on "New".


You can now choose whether to set up a recurring task or a one off task.

If you click on the "A task that launches recurrently" button the following screen appears:


The description field makes it easier to differentiate between recurring tasks. 

The command field is used to enter the command that you want to run. You can also choose whether the command is to run as an X application or not.

There are two ways to define the time and date. You can choose the basic option which lets you specify whether the task runs every minute, every hour, every day, every month or on reboot. The advanced option lets you enter the specific minute, hour, day, month and weekday. 

The rules for the advanced section are the same as for entering manually into the crontab file. The good thing about the graphical tool is that it gives you a preview telling you exactly when the command will run.

Click "Add" to add the command to the list of recurring tasks.



To schedule a one-off task click on the "New" button and select "A task that launches one time".

When the window above appears enter a description of the task and choose whether it is an X application or not.

Select a date and time to run the command and enter the task within the task window.

Click "Add" to schedule the task.

Summary

Scheduling tasks is made much easier by using the Gnome scheduling tool.

The examples I have given above are very simplistic and in reality cron jobs are used for much more sophisticated tasks such as scheduling backups.

Cron jobs are more useful on computers that are kept on for long periods of time but can be useful for providing reminders during the day.

It is worth reading the manuals for cron (man cron) and at (man at)

I hope you found this guide useful. 




An Everyday Linux User Guide To Scheduling Tasks Within Linux

Introduction

Sometimes when I get involved in a task I lose track of time. This can have really bad consequences if left unchecked such as forgetting to pick up my daughter from the bus stop or forgetting to take stuff out of the oven.

I am also the type of person that becomes so involved in their work that I can easily forget to stop for food and neglect to take breaks.

If I know I am going to be working from home I now set up a job to pop up a message at certain points in the day to remind me to do something.

To schedule tasks in Linux there are two useful tools that are worth knowing about:
  • at
  • cron
In this guide I am briefly going to touch upon these two commands and then I am going to show you the Everyday Linux User way which I find to be much easier.

Scheduling A Job To Occur Once Using at

The at command makes it possible to run a task in the future. For instance using the examples from my introduction I might want to set a task to run at 3 PM to remind me to pick up my daughter from the bus.

There are various tools for sending a message to the screen including xmessage which is very basic and the one I like to use which is kind of novel called xcowsay.

xcowsay displays a picture of a cow and the message you would like displayed within a speech bubble.


The syntax for the at command is as follows:

at <time>
> command

There are various ways to specify the time such as by specifying the hours and minutes or by specifying midnight, noon or teatime. You can specify to run the command today, tomorrow, in 5 days time or 5 weeks from now.

Here are a few examples for setting the time you want to run a scheduled task:

  • at 9:45 PM - runs command at 9:45 pm
  • at 10:00 AM - runs command at 10:00 am
  • at 9:30 PM tomorrow - runs command at 9:30 pm tomorrow
  • at 4:00 PM + 3 days - runs command 3 days from now at 4 pm
  • at 10:00 AM Jun 25 - runs command at 10 am on June 25th
The command element can be any command but to display output to the screen the command needs to know which screen to send it to.

Therefore to run a program such as xcowsay you would do the following:

at 11:00 PM
> export DISPLAY=:0 && xcowsay "Time for bed"

This command will run at 11 PM. The export display=:0 tells the job to display output to the screen and xcowsay displays the text "Time for bed" in a speech bubble coming from a cartoon cow.

The at command is useful if you want to run a command in the future only once.

If you want to see all the commands that are set to run in the future type atq

10 Fri Oct 24 22:09:00 2014 a gary

Of course the at command can be used for much more powerful things than just displaying messages. 

If you want to remove a scheduled task run the atrm <jobid>. The job id can be seen by running the atq command. The job ID is the number on the left.

Scheduling A Recurring Job Using cron

cron is useful for scheduling jobs that are to occur again and again.


For instance, if I work from home between Monday and Friday I might want to be notified when it is lunchtime and to schedule drinks breaks.

To schedule a task you have to use the crontab -e command which opens a file as follows:



The command in the above screenshot displays the message "Have lunch" every weekday at 12:30.

The timings look a bit weird when you first see them but basically from left to right they are:


  • Minutes
  • Hours
  • Day Of Month
  • Month
  • Day Of Week
If you look at the command in the screenshot again you will see it looks as follows:

30 12 * * 1-5 command

So the first number as shown by the key above is minutes. That means at 30 minutes past the hour the command specified is going to run.

If the command was 30 * * * * then the command would run 30 minutes past every hour on every day.

The second number in the key above is hours. That means that at 12:30 the command will run.

Again if the command was 30 12 * * * the command would run at 12:30 every day.

The third number is the day of the month. In the command above it is set to * which means every day.

The fourth value is the month. In the command above it is set to * which means every month. You can specify any month number between 1 and 12.

Finally the 5th number is the day of the week. Therefore if you want the command to run every Monday you specify 1.

As you can see my 5th number is set to 1-5. This means the command will run on every day between 1 and 5. (i.e. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday).

If you want a command to run every 5 minutes between 9 AM and 5 PM every day you would use the following syntax:

*/5 9-17 * * * command

The /n (where n is the number to skip by) means the command will run all the time but skip by the number specified by n. 

If you want to run a command at multiple times in the day you can use a comma to separate the times as follows:

5 12,15,18 * * * command

The above command will run at 12:05,  15:05 and 18:05.

Saving the file and exiting the program automatically updates cron and the events will start firing as and when they are supposed to.

Using corntab to schedule a task

The corntab website provides a visual crontab editor for helping to schedule cron jobs.

This makes it easier to add recurring jobs without remembering the rules from the previous section.

 
All you have to do is select each category (minute, hour, day of month, month and day of week) and visually select the values you are looking for. You can enter the command you want to run in a dedicated text box.

This provides you with the command that you need to paste into the crontab editor.


















As good as corntab is there is an even easier way to schedule tasks.

Schedule Tasks Using gnome-schedule
















The easiest way to schedule tasks is to use Gnome Schedule (gnome-schedule)

Gnome Schedule can be found within the package managers of most distributions.

When you run gnome-schedule a list of tasks will appear. The tasks can be one-off tasks or recurring.

To add a new task click on "New".


You can now choose whether to set up a recurring task or a one off task.

If you click on the "A task that launches recurrently" button the following screen appears:


The description field makes it easier to differentiate between recurring tasks. 

The command field is used to enter the command that you want to run. You can also choose whether the command is to run as an X application or not.

There are two ways to define the time and date. You can choose the basic option which lets you specify whether the task runs every minute, every hour, every day, every month or on reboot. The advanced option lets you enter the specific minute, hour, day, month and weekday. 

The rules for the advanced section are the same as for entering manually into the crontab file. The good thing about the graphical tool is that it gives you a preview telling you exactly when the command will run.

Click "Add" to add the command to the list of recurring tasks.



To schedule a one-off task click on the "New" button and select "A task that launches one time".

When the window above appears enter a description of the task and choose whether it is an X application or not.

Select a date and time to run the command and enter the task within the task window.

Click "Add" to schedule the task.

Summary

Scheduling tasks is made much easier by using the Gnome scheduling tool.

The examples I have given above are very simplistic and in reality cron jobs are used for much more sophisticated tasks such as scheduling backups.

Cron jobs are more useful on computers that are kept on for long periods of time but can be useful for providing reminders during the day.

It is worth reading the manuals for cron (man cron) and at (man at)

I hope you found this guide useful. 




Posted at 23:16 |  by Gary Newell

Saturday, 18 October 2014

Introduction

4MLinux is a mini Linux distribution. The name stems from the 4 Ms which are Multimedia, MiniServer, Maintenance and Mystery. To be honest the 4th M really should be a G because there is no mystery, the 4th component is definitely games. I guess that 3MAnd1GLinux doesn't really roll off the tongue.

The reason I have chosen to review this distribution is because of the gaming element. You can read all about 4MLinux by clicking on this link.

Minimum Requirements

The requirements listed on the 4MLinux website state that you need 256 megabytes of RAM for 4MLinux but 1 gigabyte for the all in one edition.

Where To Get 4MLinux

To download 4MLinux click this link.

The file size for 4MLinux is only 392 megabytes in size.

Instructions for creating a Live USB drive and Live CD can be found here. Basically if you are creating a live CD use CD/DVD burning software or to create a live USB use UNetbootin.

Installing 4MLinux

I wouldn't personally recommend installing 4MLinux as a dual boot distribution. If you are going to install it I would use a dedicated machine or a virtual machine on an existing computer using VirtualBox.

In order to install 4MLinux you will need to boot from the live USB or CD.

Before you can install 4M Linux you need to partition the drive. This will wipe all the data on the drive so make sure you have backed up anything you need.








The partition tool can be found by clicking on the menu icon and selecting the maintenance category followed by partitions and then part wizard. You will be asked whether you want to install the software which of course you do.

Select the drive that matches your hard disk and then select each partition in turn and delete them. Now create two new partitions, one for 4MLinux formatted to EXT4 and a small swap partition.

To install 4MLinux, click on the menu icon in the bottom left corner. Navigate to the 4MLinux menu category and click on the installer.

























The installer is a shell script and it is an incredibly quick process. Click "Enter" when you see the welcome message.

























You will be asked where you want to install 4MLinux. Choose the one that isn't the swap partition. 

























You will be asked whether 4MLinux is to be the only operating system on your computer and to be honest if you are going to use 4MLinux this is the only thing I can recommend. By saying yes to this question the lilo bootloader will be installed.

























A summary of changes will appear. Click yes if you want to continue with the installation. It took less than a minute to install on my test computer which is 8 years old. (I think I am actually exaggerating when I say it took a minute, it might be even less than that).

Reboot your computer and you will be asked to create a password for the root user. Enter the password you wish to use. The final step is to choose your timezone.

You can now login to 4MLinux. Until you create another user you have to login as root.

To start the graphical user interface type startx.

First Impressions
























4MLinux uses the JWM window manager which is extremely lightweight. There is a panel at the bottom and a panel at the top. You can also toggle conky on and off to provide statistics.

The icons on the bottom panel from left to right are for the menu, show desktop, internet connection, audio settings, language/keyboard, printer settings, touch screen settings, bluetooth settings, eject CD/DVD and workspaces. In the bottom right corner are icons for volume control settings, a calendar, a performance monitor and the all important clock.

The menu is a basic affair with categories down the left side linking to sub categories and applications.

Connecting To The Internet

This section is usually quite short but for 4MLinux connecting to the internet was surprisingly challenging.

On the menu there is an internet category with a settings sub menu and 4 options:

  • Configure
  • WiFiScan
  • WPA Gui
  • Connect
The Configure option lets you choose whether you plan to connect via ethernet or wireless and then whether to use WPA Supplicant to connect to the internet.

The WiFiScan option simply lists the available WIFI networks.

WPA Gui is a graphical tool for setting up an internet connection and Connect runs a script to connect to the internet.

So here is the problem. I wanted to connect to a wireless network and so I chose WPA GUI. The only option shown is for ethernet. I therefore ran the configure option and chose to use WLAN (wireless).


I double clicked on the network I wanted to connect to and I was shown a properties window to set up the connection.



This screen isn't the most intuitive you will ever see and it took a fair amount of trial and error to choose the correct authentication, encryption and key to get a valid connection.


Despite the connection being set up correctly, clicking on the connect option within WPA GUI didn't create an actual connection to the wireless network.

I therefore chose the Connect option from the internet settings menu and this finally gave me a connection.

I would like to say now though that this was not just an A to B to C to D to get it working. There was a lot of messing around before it worked. On subsequent reboots the connection remains intact and I can simply select the connect option from the internet settings menu or bottom panel.

Flash and MP3









MP3s worked without a hitch but Flash was an altogether different proposition and for reasons I will come to later a little bit on the strange side.

The web browser for 4MLinux is Qupzilla and this is a fairly basic web browser. There are options though for installing Firefox and Seamonkey. Here comes the bizarre bit. The Firefox link asks whether you want to install Firefox, but not the Linux version of Firefox. The installer installs the Windows version and uses WINE to run it and the installer asks if you want to install Flash which is also the Windows version. Even more bizarre is that the Seamonkey link also installs the Windows version.

Applications

The applications that are installed with 4MLinux depend on the version that you have installed. I installed the full version and so have the complete set.

Internet

  • Links, QupZilla, FireFox (Windows Version), SeaMonkey (Windows Version)  - Web Browser
  • Thunderbird - Email Client (Windows version via WINE)
  • FTP
  • IRC
  • P2P
  • SSH

Maintenance

  • XFE, Midnight Commander - File Manager
  • GnuParted - Partitioning Tool
  • PartWizard - GUI Partitioning Tool
  • FDisk / CDisk - MBR Disk Management
  • GDisk / CGDisk - GPT Disk Management
  • TestDisk, PhotoRec, GnuDDRescue - Recovery
  • ClamAV - Antivirus
  • System Monitor 
  • InfraCode - CD/DVD Creator
  • 7Zip, PeaZip - Archive Tool
  • UNetbootin - USB Disk Creator

Multimedia

  • QMMP, Xine (Audio Players)
  • MPlayer, SMPlayer (Media Players)
  • SMTube (YouTube Player)
  • FFMPEG, Audacity - Audio File Editing
  • ImageMagick - Image Editor

MiniServer

  • Apache, SQLLite, VNC

Games

  • Snake, Tetris, Mines, Towers, Casino, GnuGo, NetToe, Chess - Console Games
  • Rocks, Lin City, ZBlast, WinBoard, MahJongg, Koules, Galaga, Jump - XGames
  • Eyes, Penguin - XToys
  • BattleShips, Blubbels, CoorCode, FairSeaBattle, Hexalate, Peg-E-Game - QTGames
  • TuxRacer, Circus, Kobo, LBreakout, LBreakout 2, LMarbles, LTetris, Doom, Heretic, Hexen, Quake, Quake 2, Fairdoom, Digger, Jump Man, Mario, PacMan, Wolf 3d - SDL Games

Other


  • WINE - Play Windows Software Within Linux
  • LibreOffice Installer, Skype Installer, VirtualBox Installer, Java RE Installer
As mentioned earlier there are some strange inclusions such as the Windows versions of FireFox and SeaMonkey but there are some reasonably good software choices for a lightweight distribution  such as QMMP, MPlayer and ImageMagick. 

There is a decent selection of Linux based games whether they are designed for the console, XGames, SDL Games or QT.






The variety on offer actually makes 4MLinux quite fun and I spent a number of hours playing the novelty games and the old school classics before finally settling on the real aces which are Doom, Quake and Wolf 3D. 

DOSBox and WINE are also installed making it possible to install and play your old DOS and Windows games.

Installing Applications

If you want to install packages that aren't already installed you have to navigate to the /var/4MLinux folder where there is a list of available packages.

To install an application type zk <filename>. The choices are fairly limited.

Customisation



Changing the wallpaper is possible by selecting an option on the desktop. A small application will open which allows you to choose from a variety of different images.

You can also toggle the visibility of the top panel and conky. You can also toggle 3D effects on and off.

Summary

4MLinux is one of the more unique Linux distributions available. The developers have obviously tried to get in as much as possible without taking up too much memory and disk space.

The 4 Ms stand for Maintenance, MiniServer, Multimedia and Mystery. 

For maintenance purposes it would be adequate for rescue purposes but the hit and miss nature of trying establish a WIFI connection was worrying and I'm not sure whether the tools included are better than the tools included for other rescue disks.

As a server it would be fine enough for development purposes but are there enough development tools available and could you really trust it as a real server?

For multimedia 4MLinux has media players and editors which are ok but nothing better than any other distribution.

That leaves Mystery which really stands for fun and games. The games will keep you amused for quite a while and the inclusion of DOOM and Quake was a good call. 

The choice to include Windows versions of FireFox and SeaMonkey seems a bit nonsensical and the lack of a real package manager makes 4MLinux feel limited.

4MLinux as a fully installed distribution is not really going to benefit the everyday Linux user but you could run it as a live image for playing games. For anything other purposes expect to spend time working through issues. 

There are other small distributions that do a very similar thing to 4MLinux, such as Knoppix and various flavours of PuppyLinux including Simplicity, MacPup and PuppyArcade. It is hard to recommend 4MLinux over any of those distributions.

Thankyou for reading.


An Everyday Linux User Review Of 4MLinux

Introduction

4MLinux is a mini Linux distribution. The name stems from the 4 Ms which are Multimedia, MiniServer, Maintenance and Mystery. To be honest the 4th M really should be a G because there is no mystery, the 4th component is definitely games. I guess that 3MAnd1GLinux doesn't really roll off the tongue.

The reason I have chosen to review this distribution is because of the gaming element. You can read all about 4MLinux by clicking on this link.

Minimum Requirements

The requirements listed on the 4MLinux website state that you need 256 megabytes of RAM for 4MLinux but 1 gigabyte for the all in one edition.

Where To Get 4MLinux

To download 4MLinux click this link.

The file size for 4MLinux is only 392 megabytes in size.

Instructions for creating a Live USB drive and Live CD can be found here. Basically if you are creating a live CD use CD/DVD burning software or to create a live USB use UNetbootin.

Installing 4MLinux

I wouldn't personally recommend installing 4MLinux as a dual boot distribution. If you are going to install it I would use a dedicated machine or a virtual machine on an existing computer using VirtualBox.

In order to install 4MLinux you will need to boot from the live USB or CD.

Before you can install 4M Linux you need to partition the drive. This will wipe all the data on the drive so make sure you have backed up anything you need.








The partition tool can be found by clicking on the menu icon and selecting the maintenance category followed by partitions and then part wizard. You will be asked whether you want to install the software which of course you do.

Select the drive that matches your hard disk and then select each partition in turn and delete them. Now create two new partitions, one for 4MLinux formatted to EXT4 and a small swap partition.

To install 4MLinux, click on the menu icon in the bottom left corner. Navigate to the 4MLinux menu category and click on the installer.

























The installer is a shell script and it is an incredibly quick process. Click "Enter" when you see the welcome message.

























You will be asked where you want to install 4MLinux. Choose the one that isn't the swap partition. 

























You will be asked whether 4MLinux is to be the only operating system on your computer and to be honest if you are going to use 4MLinux this is the only thing I can recommend. By saying yes to this question the lilo bootloader will be installed.

























A summary of changes will appear. Click yes if you want to continue with the installation. It took less than a minute to install on my test computer which is 8 years old. (I think I am actually exaggerating when I say it took a minute, it might be even less than that).

Reboot your computer and you will be asked to create a password for the root user. Enter the password you wish to use. The final step is to choose your timezone.

You can now login to 4MLinux. Until you create another user you have to login as root.

To start the graphical user interface type startx.

First Impressions
























4MLinux uses the JWM window manager which is extremely lightweight. There is a panel at the bottom and a panel at the top. You can also toggle conky on and off to provide statistics.

The icons on the bottom panel from left to right are for the menu, show desktop, internet connection, audio settings, language/keyboard, printer settings, touch screen settings, bluetooth settings, eject CD/DVD and workspaces. In the bottom right corner are icons for volume control settings, a calendar, a performance monitor and the all important clock.

The menu is a basic affair with categories down the left side linking to sub categories and applications.

Connecting To The Internet

This section is usually quite short but for 4MLinux connecting to the internet was surprisingly challenging.

On the menu there is an internet category with a settings sub menu and 4 options:

  • Configure
  • WiFiScan
  • WPA Gui
  • Connect
The Configure option lets you choose whether you plan to connect via ethernet or wireless and then whether to use WPA Supplicant to connect to the internet.

The WiFiScan option simply lists the available WIFI networks.

WPA Gui is a graphical tool for setting up an internet connection and Connect runs a script to connect to the internet.

So here is the problem. I wanted to connect to a wireless network and so I chose WPA GUI. The only option shown is for ethernet. I therefore ran the configure option and chose to use WLAN (wireless).


I double clicked on the network I wanted to connect to and I was shown a properties window to set up the connection.



This screen isn't the most intuitive you will ever see and it took a fair amount of trial and error to choose the correct authentication, encryption and key to get a valid connection.


Despite the connection being set up correctly, clicking on the connect option within WPA GUI didn't create an actual connection to the wireless network.

I therefore chose the Connect option from the internet settings menu and this finally gave me a connection.

I would like to say now though that this was not just an A to B to C to D to get it working. There was a lot of messing around before it worked. On subsequent reboots the connection remains intact and I can simply select the connect option from the internet settings menu or bottom panel.

Flash and MP3









MP3s worked without a hitch but Flash was an altogether different proposition and for reasons I will come to later a little bit on the strange side.

The web browser for 4MLinux is Qupzilla and this is a fairly basic web browser. There are options though for installing Firefox and Seamonkey. Here comes the bizarre bit. The Firefox link asks whether you want to install Firefox, but not the Linux version of Firefox. The installer installs the Windows version and uses WINE to run it and the installer asks if you want to install Flash which is also the Windows version. Even more bizarre is that the Seamonkey link also installs the Windows version.

Applications

The applications that are installed with 4MLinux depend on the version that you have installed. I installed the full version and so have the complete set.

Internet

  • Links, QupZilla, FireFox (Windows Version), SeaMonkey (Windows Version)  - Web Browser
  • Thunderbird - Email Client (Windows version via WINE)
  • FTP
  • IRC
  • P2P
  • SSH

Maintenance

  • XFE, Midnight Commander - File Manager
  • GnuParted - Partitioning Tool
  • PartWizard - GUI Partitioning Tool
  • FDisk / CDisk - MBR Disk Management
  • GDisk / CGDisk - GPT Disk Management
  • TestDisk, PhotoRec, GnuDDRescue - Recovery
  • ClamAV - Antivirus
  • System Monitor 
  • InfraCode - CD/DVD Creator
  • 7Zip, PeaZip - Archive Tool
  • UNetbootin - USB Disk Creator

Multimedia

  • QMMP, Xine (Audio Players)
  • MPlayer, SMPlayer (Media Players)
  • SMTube (YouTube Player)
  • FFMPEG, Audacity - Audio File Editing
  • ImageMagick - Image Editor

MiniServer

  • Apache, SQLLite, VNC

Games

  • Snake, Tetris, Mines, Towers, Casino, GnuGo, NetToe, Chess - Console Games
  • Rocks, Lin City, ZBlast, WinBoard, MahJongg, Koules, Galaga, Jump - XGames
  • Eyes, Penguin - XToys
  • BattleShips, Blubbels, CoorCode, FairSeaBattle, Hexalate, Peg-E-Game - QTGames
  • TuxRacer, Circus, Kobo, LBreakout, LBreakout 2, LMarbles, LTetris, Doom, Heretic, Hexen, Quake, Quake 2, Fairdoom, Digger, Jump Man, Mario, PacMan, Wolf 3d - SDL Games

Other


  • WINE - Play Windows Software Within Linux
  • LibreOffice Installer, Skype Installer, VirtualBox Installer, Java RE Installer
As mentioned earlier there are some strange inclusions such as the Windows versions of FireFox and SeaMonkey but there are some reasonably good software choices for a lightweight distribution  such as QMMP, MPlayer and ImageMagick. 

There is a decent selection of Linux based games whether they are designed for the console, XGames, SDL Games or QT.






The variety on offer actually makes 4MLinux quite fun and I spent a number of hours playing the novelty games and the old school classics before finally settling on the real aces which are Doom, Quake and Wolf 3D. 

DOSBox and WINE are also installed making it possible to install and play your old DOS and Windows games.

Installing Applications

If you want to install packages that aren't already installed you have to navigate to the /var/4MLinux folder where there is a list of available packages.

To install an application type zk <filename>. The choices are fairly limited.

Customisation



Changing the wallpaper is possible by selecting an option on the desktop. A small application will open which allows you to choose from a variety of different images.

You can also toggle the visibility of the top panel and conky. You can also toggle 3D effects on and off.

Summary

4MLinux is one of the more unique Linux distributions available. The developers have obviously tried to get in as much as possible without taking up too much memory and disk space.

The 4 Ms stand for Maintenance, MiniServer, Multimedia and Mystery. 

For maintenance purposes it would be adequate for rescue purposes but the hit and miss nature of trying establish a WIFI connection was worrying and I'm not sure whether the tools included are better than the tools included for other rescue disks.

As a server it would be fine enough for development purposes but are there enough development tools available and could you really trust it as a real server?

For multimedia 4MLinux has media players and editors which are ok but nothing better than any other distribution.

That leaves Mystery which really stands for fun and games. The games will keep you amused for quite a while and the inclusion of DOOM and Quake was a good call. 

The choice to include Windows versions of FireFox and SeaMonkey seems a bit nonsensical and the lack of a real package manager makes 4MLinux feel limited.

4MLinux as a fully installed distribution is not really going to benefit the everyday Linux user but you could run it as a live image for playing games. For anything other purposes expect to spend time working through issues. 

There are other small distributions that do a very similar thing to 4MLinux, such as Knoppix and various flavours of PuppyLinux including Simplicity, MacPup and PuppyArcade. It is hard to recommend 4MLinux over any of those distributions.

Thankyou for reading.


Posted at 22:08 |  by Gary Newell

Saturday, 11 October 2014

Introduction

Over the past month or so I have been looking at classic gaming from an Everyday Linux User's point of view.

I started off by looking at retrogaming in general within Linux including the options available such as where to get games and how to set up controllers.

I followed up that article with a guide showing how to run DOS games using PlayOnLinux. The importance of using PlayOnLinux for this purpose comes into play when you also want to run classic Windows games within PlayOnlinux. Being able to play all the games you want using one application as a launchpad has to be a good thing. For those of you wanting to run DOS games using DOSBox on its own there is a guide for that as well.

Last week I wrote a review about a Linux distribution designed for gamers called Play Linux. The intentions of Play Linux are clear and that is to be the best gaming Linux distribution around.

This week has been somewhat challenging as my internet connection let me down once more. I was however afforded more time to test this week's distribution which is SparkyLinux Gameover Edition and that is the topic of today's review.

Before I start though I wanted to mention another article you might be interested in which looks at 5 of the best games emulators for Linux that I wrote for linux.about.com.

Installation

I mentioned in my previous review of SparkyLinux that the installer isn't as straight forward as some of the others that are available.

To download SparkyLinux visit http://sparkylinux.org/download/.
The GameOver edition of SparkyLinux is 3.8 gigabytes in size so If you have a poor internet connection you can always buy a DVD or USB drive with SparkyLinux pre-installed.
The SparkyLinux website has a full installation guide available at http://sparkylinux.org/hard-drive-install/

First Impressions





















SparkyLinux Gameover Edition uses a basic LXDE setup and the whole distribution is geared towards games with no frills and spills for anything else.

There is the standard LXDE panel at the bottom with a menu, the ability to switch between virtual desktops and icons for setting up bluetooth, wireless networks, audio settings and the all important clock. (Actually the clock is very important because you can easily lose track of time. I was up until 1 a.m the other day playing Sensible Soccer).

On the right side of the screen a list of useful metrics are displayed via the Conky interface. CPU usage and memory usage are probably the most useful pieces of information.

At the top of the screen is another LXDE panel with icons to key games, Steam, PlayOnLinux, DOSbox and a number of different games emulators.

Connecting To The Internet





















Let's get the standard review features out of the way first.

To connect to a wired or wireless network click on the network icon in the system tray and choose the network you wish to connect to and enter the security key if required.

Flash and MP3


As with the Razor-QT version of SparkyLinux, Flash works without a hitch and MP3s are playable with no extra steps required.

Applications

In this section I would normally list all the applications for a distribution but with the Gameover edition it isn't possible. I will try and cover as much as possible though.

Accessories

  • Conky  (Displays system settings)
  • PCManFM (File Manager
  • Sparky Screenshot (Screengrabber)
  • USB Image Writer (Writes ISO images to USB drives)
  • USB Stick Formatter (Formats USB drives)
  • XFBurn (Burn images and audio to disk)
  • XArchiver (Zip file management)

Graphics

  • Camorama (Webcam viewer)
  • ImageMagick (Image editing)
  • XPDF (PDF viewer)

Internet

  • Dropbox (Online file storage)
  • Iceweasel (Web browser)
  • Pidgin (Instant messenger)
  • Transmission (Bittorrent client)
  • uget (Download management)

Sound and Video

  • Radiotray
  • VLC Media Player

Games

  • 0 A.D, 3D Chess
  • Airstrike, Alien Blaster,  Amphetamine, Armagetron Advanced, Ascii Jump, Asylum, Atomix
  • Balder 2D, Barrage, Battle For Wesnoth, Battle Tanks, Berusky, Billiard-GL, Biniax 2, Black Box, Blobby Volley 2, Bloboats, Blow Wars, Blockout 2, Brain Party, Bygfoot
  • Chess, Chromium BSU
  • DesMuMe (Nintendo DS Emulator), Desura, Dosbox (DOS Emulator)
  • Einstein, Extreme Tux Racer
  • Five or more, Flare, FooBilliard, Four in a row, Freecraft, Freedroid, Frozen Bubble, Funny Boat
  • Gnome Video Arcade (GUI for MAME), Gnubik, Gnugo, GTKAtlantic, Gunroar,
  • Hearts, Holding Nuts
  • Iagno, I have no tomatoes
  • Klotski
  • LBreakout 2, Lights Off, Liquid War, LTris
  • Maelstrom, Mahjongg, Mastermind, Megaglest, Mines, Minestest, Mokomaze, Monsterz, Moonlander
  • Nestopia (NES Emulator), Netpanzer, Neverputt, Neverball, Nibbles
  • OpenArena
  • PCSX (Playstation Emulator), Performous, Pingus, PlayOnLinux (GUI for WINE)
  • Quadrapassel
  • Robots
  • Scorched 3D, Secret Maryo Chronicles, Slime Volley, Snake 4, Snowballz, STEAM, Stella, Sudoku, SuperTux, SuperTuxKart, Swell Foop
  • Tali, Teeworld, Tennix, Tetravex, Tetzle, Transcend
  • Virtualboy Advance (Gameboy Advance Emulator)
  • Warzone 2100, Widelands
  • XMoto
  • Yabause (Sega Saturn Emulator)
  • Zaz, ZSNES
This distribution is aimed at gaming and therefore other than games and emulators there isn't all that much to SparkyLinux. There are no office applications, so you can't even be tempted to do any work and the graphics, audio and video applications are kept to the bare minimum.

I like the fact that Radiotray was included. Radiotray lets you choose to listen to a large number of online web radio stations by choosing them from a menu linked to the LXDE panel.

Steam is obviously included, as is PlayOnLinux. Last week when I reviewed Play Linux I suggested that maybe there wasn't enough to make it stand out on its own as yet but the Gameover Edition of SparkyLinux cannot be accused of the same thing.



There are games in the bucket full including a whole host of Linux specific titles such as Battle For Wesnoth, SuperTux and SuperTuxKart.

There are emulators available for most of the best games consoles from the past 30 years although there are some notable exceptions such as a Nintendo 64 emulator.


For those of you who like really old games there is Stella which emulates the Atari 2600.

ZSnes is a games emulator for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) and Nestopia is a games emulator for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES).




























Videoboy Advance is a Gameboy Advance emulator. As well as allowing you to play Gameboy Advance games you can also run Gameboy Colour and standard Gameboy games as well.

The screenshot above is for Manic Miner which was excellently updated for the Gameboy Advance. If you want to emulate DS games there is DesMuMe.
































The Yabause emulator lets you play Sega Saturn games but as you can see from the image above the results aren't always perfect. SparkyLinux lacks an emulator for Sega Mastersystem, Megadrive, Genesis and Gamegear games. To be honest there aren't that many good Sega emulators out there. My own personal preference is Kega Fusion.





























For Playstation fans there is the PCSX emulator which works reasonably well although there is the odd glitch.































For MAME users the Gnome Video Arcade has been included which provides a nice graphical user interface for choosing games.

I found it quite difficult at first working out where to put the ROM files but got there in the end. (/usr/share/games/mame/roms).

Installing Applications

























SparkyLinux has a tool called APTus which combines a few key system tasks such as upgrading the system, updating package lists, selecting repositories and of course installing new programs.


The APTus installer simply asks for the name of the program you wish to install which is great if you know the name of the program but not so good if you don't.

Fortunately Synaptic is also included which provides a decent search facility.

Controllers

SparkyLinux has a joystick calibration tool to enable you to configure your joysticks but it might be worth reading my article about Retrogaming with Linux as it provides advice on how to set up controllers for older games.

Summary

There is a lot to like about Sparkylinux Gameover Edition with its abundance of games, choices of emulators and the fact it comes with Steam, PlayOnLinux and Dosbox pre-installed.

The system was stable in the most part but you can't always guarantee what an emulator is going to do and on the odd occasion my screen resolution changed.

With so many games available the LXDE menu system felt a bit overloaded. Ways around this problem include adding your favourites to the panel at the top or installing either Slingscold for a nicer dash style display or Cairo as a dock.

All in all, SparkyLinux Gameover Edition provided me with the most fun that I have had in ages and it has been a welcome guest during my internet free week.

Thankyou for reading.

An Everyday Linux User Review Of SparkyLinux Gameover Edition

Introduction

Over the past month or so I have been looking at classic gaming from an Everyday Linux User's point of view.

I started off by looking at retrogaming in general within Linux including the options available such as where to get games and how to set up controllers.

I followed up that article with a guide showing how to run DOS games using PlayOnLinux. The importance of using PlayOnLinux for this purpose comes into play when you also want to run classic Windows games within PlayOnlinux. Being able to play all the games you want using one application as a launchpad has to be a good thing. For those of you wanting to run DOS games using DOSBox on its own there is a guide for that as well.

Last week I wrote a review about a Linux distribution designed for gamers called Play Linux. The intentions of Play Linux are clear and that is to be the best gaming Linux distribution around.

This week has been somewhat challenging as my internet connection let me down once more. I was however afforded more time to test this week's distribution which is SparkyLinux Gameover Edition and that is the topic of today's review.

Before I start though I wanted to mention another article you might be interested in which looks at 5 of the best games emulators for Linux that I wrote for linux.about.com.

Installation

I mentioned in my previous review of SparkyLinux that the installer isn't as straight forward as some of the others that are available.

To download SparkyLinux visit http://sparkylinux.org/download/.
The GameOver edition of SparkyLinux is 3.8 gigabytes in size so If you have a poor internet connection you can always buy a DVD or USB drive with SparkyLinux pre-installed.
The SparkyLinux website has a full installation guide available at http://sparkylinux.org/hard-drive-install/

First Impressions





















SparkyLinux Gameover Edition uses a basic LXDE setup and the whole distribution is geared towards games with no frills and spills for anything else.

There is the standard LXDE panel at the bottom with a menu, the ability to switch between virtual desktops and icons for setting up bluetooth, wireless networks, audio settings and the all important clock. (Actually the clock is very important because you can easily lose track of time. I was up until 1 a.m the other day playing Sensible Soccer).

On the right side of the screen a list of useful metrics are displayed via the Conky interface. CPU usage and memory usage are probably the most useful pieces of information.

At the top of the screen is another LXDE panel with icons to key games, Steam, PlayOnLinux, DOSbox and a number of different games emulators.

Connecting To The Internet





















Let's get the standard review features out of the way first.

To connect to a wired or wireless network click on the network icon in the system tray and choose the network you wish to connect to and enter the security key if required.

Flash and MP3


As with the Razor-QT version of SparkyLinux, Flash works without a hitch and MP3s are playable with no extra steps required.

Applications

In this section I would normally list all the applications for a distribution but with the Gameover edition it isn't possible. I will try and cover as much as possible though.

Accessories

  • Conky  (Displays system settings)
  • PCManFM (File Manager
  • Sparky Screenshot (Screengrabber)
  • USB Image Writer (Writes ISO images to USB drives)
  • USB Stick Formatter (Formats USB drives)
  • XFBurn (Burn images and audio to disk)
  • XArchiver (Zip file management)

Graphics

  • Camorama (Webcam viewer)
  • ImageMagick (Image editing)
  • XPDF (PDF viewer)

Internet

  • Dropbox (Online file storage)
  • Iceweasel (Web browser)
  • Pidgin (Instant messenger)
  • Transmission (Bittorrent client)
  • uget (Download management)

Sound and Video

  • Radiotray
  • VLC Media Player

Games

  • 0 A.D, 3D Chess
  • Airstrike, Alien Blaster,  Amphetamine, Armagetron Advanced, Ascii Jump, Asylum, Atomix
  • Balder 2D, Barrage, Battle For Wesnoth, Battle Tanks, Berusky, Billiard-GL, Biniax 2, Black Box, Blobby Volley 2, Bloboats, Blow Wars, Blockout 2, Brain Party, Bygfoot
  • Chess, Chromium BSU
  • DesMuMe (Nintendo DS Emulator), Desura, Dosbox (DOS Emulator)
  • Einstein, Extreme Tux Racer
  • Five or more, Flare, FooBilliard, Four in a row, Freecraft, Freedroid, Frozen Bubble, Funny Boat
  • Gnome Video Arcade (GUI for MAME), Gnubik, Gnugo, GTKAtlantic, Gunroar,
  • Hearts, Holding Nuts
  • Iagno, I have no tomatoes
  • Klotski
  • LBreakout 2, Lights Off, Liquid War, LTris
  • Maelstrom, Mahjongg, Mastermind, Megaglest, Mines, Minestest, Mokomaze, Monsterz, Moonlander
  • Nestopia (NES Emulator), Netpanzer, Neverputt, Neverball, Nibbles
  • OpenArena
  • PCSX (Playstation Emulator), Performous, Pingus, PlayOnLinux (GUI for WINE)
  • Quadrapassel
  • Robots
  • Scorched 3D, Secret Maryo Chronicles, Slime Volley, Snake 4, Snowballz, STEAM, Stella, Sudoku, SuperTux, SuperTuxKart, Swell Foop
  • Tali, Teeworld, Tennix, Tetravex, Tetzle, Transcend
  • Virtualboy Advance (Gameboy Advance Emulator)
  • Warzone 2100, Widelands
  • XMoto
  • Yabause (Sega Saturn Emulator)
  • Zaz, ZSNES
This distribution is aimed at gaming and therefore other than games and emulators there isn't all that much to SparkyLinux. There are no office applications, so you can't even be tempted to do any work and the graphics, audio and video applications are kept to the bare minimum.

I like the fact that Radiotray was included. Radiotray lets you choose to listen to a large number of online web radio stations by choosing them from a menu linked to the LXDE panel.

Steam is obviously included, as is PlayOnLinux. Last week when I reviewed Play Linux I suggested that maybe there wasn't enough to make it stand out on its own as yet but the Gameover Edition of SparkyLinux cannot be accused of the same thing.



There are games in the bucket full including a whole host of Linux specific titles such as Battle For Wesnoth, SuperTux and SuperTuxKart.

There are emulators available for most of the best games consoles from the past 30 years although there are some notable exceptions such as a Nintendo 64 emulator.


For those of you who like really old games there is Stella which emulates the Atari 2600.

ZSnes is a games emulator for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) and Nestopia is a games emulator for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES).




























Videoboy Advance is a Gameboy Advance emulator. As well as allowing you to play Gameboy Advance games you can also run Gameboy Colour and standard Gameboy games as well.

The screenshot above is for Manic Miner which was excellently updated for the Gameboy Advance. If you want to emulate DS games there is DesMuMe.
































The Yabause emulator lets you play Sega Saturn games but as you can see from the image above the results aren't always perfect. SparkyLinux lacks an emulator for Sega Mastersystem, Megadrive, Genesis and Gamegear games. To be honest there aren't that many good Sega emulators out there. My own personal preference is Kega Fusion.





























For Playstation fans there is the PCSX emulator which works reasonably well although there is the odd glitch.































For MAME users the Gnome Video Arcade has been included which provides a nice graphical user interface for choosing games.

I found it quite difficult at first working out where to put the ROM files but got there in the end. (/usr/share/games/mame/roms).

Installing Applications

























SparkyLinux has a tool called APTus which combines a few key system tasks such as upgrading the system, updating package lists, selecting repositories and of course installing new programs.


The APTus installer simply asks for the name of the program you wish to install which is great if you know the name of the program but not so good if you don't.

Fortunately Synaptic is also included which provides a decent search facility.

Controllers

SparkyLinux has a joystick calibration tool to enable you to configure your joysticks but it might be worth reading my article about Retrogaming with Linux as it provides advice on how to set up controllers for older games.

Summary

There is a lot to like about Sparkylinux Gameover Edition with its abundance of games, choices of emulators and the fact it comes with Steam, PlayOnLinux and Dosbox pre-installed.

The system was stable in the most part but you can't always guarantee what an emulator is going to do and on the odd occasion my screen resolution changed.

With so many games available the LXDE menu system felt a bit overloaded. Ways around this problem include adding your favourites to the panel at the top or installing either Slingscold for a nicer dash style display or Cairo as a dock.

All in all, SparkyLinux Gameover Edition provided me with the most fun that I have had in ages and it has been a welcome guest during my internet free week.

Thankyou for reading.

Posted at 20:48 |  by Gary Newell

Thursday, 2 October 2014

Introduction

When writing reviews I usually steer clear of distributions if they are not yet fully released. (i.e. if they are still in alpha or beta).

Recently however I have written articles about gaming within Linux and it just so happens I was asked to give Play Linux a go.

"Play Linux was built because there wasn't any good linux distribution made for gamers. Now there is."

The above quote can be found on the about page on the Play Linux website. I happen to know that this isn't totally true because I have more gaming distro reviews lined up in the coming weeks.

What Is Play Linux?

According to the Play Linux website:

Play Linux is a linux distro based on Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS optimized for gaming .
It combines the power of Linux with the simplicity of Ubuntu.
It comes with all GPU drivers and automatically enables your GPU!
You don't need to dual-boot anymore!

This review is therefore based on Play Linux's aims as opposed to necessarily stability as it is technically still an alpha release.

Installation

As Play Linux is based on Ubuntu the installation is a fairly straight forward affair.

I had a bit of an issue connecting to a wireless network in the live image but I think this was user error on my behalf rather than an issue with Play Linux.

I am used to entering the security key and that is about it, unless I am using the KDE desktop in which case there is the KDE wallet to deal with. Play Linux however requires you to enter a password before entering the wireless security code.

During the installation you will be asked to choose the installation language, decide whether you want to overwrite the existing operating system, install alongside or something else. You will also be asked to create a user. It is all fairly standard stuff.

First Impressions





















The default desktop environment for Play Linux is Cinnamon which is interesting because that puts it in direct competition with Linux Mint.

Cinnamon is very straight forward and whether you are from a Linux, Windows or even Mac background you will get to grips with it quite quickly.

By default the Cinnamon desktop has a panel at the bottom with a menu and quick launch icons to the left and system tray style icons to the right.

The icon set is quite interesting if a little disconcerting. For instance the icons in the quick launch area are "show desktop","Firefox","Terminal" and "Nemo". Is that a new Firefox icon?

The desktop wallpaper is a nice space theme but if you want to change it you can do so easily by right clicking on the desktop and choosing "Change desktop background".

As of yet there appear to be no other backgrounds or if there are the background changer doesn't default to the right location.

You can easily add your own wallpapers or you can go to a web browser, find the image you wish to use, right click and choose set as default wallpaper.





















It is amazing how good you can make your desktop look with the right picture.

Connecting to the internet

Choosing a network is as simple as clicking the network icon in the system tray and selecting the one you wish to use.





















As I mentioned earlier in the piece connecting to the internet caused me some confusion at first as I was busy typing in the network security code when I was asked to enter my user's password.

Once I got over that hurdle I was able to enter the network security key and connect to the internet.
 


Flash and MP3



























Flash works perfectly well within Play Linux although as you may be aware Flash is no longer being actively developed for Linux and so if you really want updated versions you need to use Chrome.

For more information on that visit read this article at Computerworld.





























MP3 audio files also play perfectly within Play Linux.

To be honest I am thinking of dropping this section from the review because it is very rare for distributions not to include the multimedia codecs anymore and they are easy to install even if they are missing.

This section does give me the license though to show some of my favourite Youtube videos and link to my favourite Flash based games.

Applications

This is the section that should set Play Linux apart as it is built for gaming and therefore should provide a good set of games or the tools required to play games.

Games

Graphics

  • GIMP - Image editing
  • ImageMagick - Image editing

Internet

  • Empathy - Messenging
  • Firefox - Web Browser
  • Kosmos - Package Manager

Office

  • LibreOffice Writer
  • LibreOffice Calc
  • LibreOffice Impress
  • LibreOffice Draw
  • LibreOffice Math
  • LibreOffice Base

Sound/Video

  • Spotify
  • VLC

Other

  • WINE - Run Windows applications and games within Linux
Few people would argue with the inclusions of Firefox, LibreOffice and GIMP as these are commonly distributed with Linux distributions.

The key decisions made include the lack of a dedicated audio player and instead the inclusion of Spotify and the inclusion of the Kosmos application.

Steam and PlayOnLinux were to be expected as this is a distribution dedicated to gamers.



Kosmos is the central place where you can set up things unique to Play Linux. The Kosmos isn't that big as yet but under the games section you will find an installer for Minecraft which will be of interest to some of you.






I think including Minecraft is a good idea as my guide for running Minecraft in Ubuntu is one of the most popular on this site and Play Linux removes the requirement for this guide as it is simply a one click installation.

Under the GPU section within Kosmos you will find graphics drivers for AMD and NVidia.




The internet section provides a choice of different browsers as well as Skype.

That really is about is for Kosmos at the moment. It will probably grow as Play Linux grows but it is fairly light in terms of functionality at the moment.



Spotify was just not playing ball for me and although it runs it just wouldn't return any results. It also wouldn't allow me to resize the window.

Steam is installed by default, well kind of. It is the Steam installer and so as soon as you click on the icon you have to wait for 200+ megabytes of updates to be installed. This isn't Play Linux's fault but rather a characteristic of Steam.

PlayOnLinux is installed as well as Steam and hopefully you have followed my guides for playing DOS games using PlayOnLinux and Windows games using PlayOnLinux.

Installing Applications



If the application you need isn't already installed, you can install it via the Ubuntu Software Centre.

Simply browse by category or use the search option to filter by title or keywords.

Summary

Play Linux is built on top of Ubuntu and because it utilises the Cinnamon desktop it is easy to install and easy to use.

Play Linux needs something to set it apart from Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Zorin and the way it is trying to do this is by providing the applications people want that aren't ordinarily installed such as Steam, PlayOnLinux, Spotify and Minecraft.

I found Play Linux to be fairly stable although I had a few minor issues such as Spotify not working and my keyboard layout defaulting to US English despite choosing UK English during the installation.

Here is the thing. Play Linux's website states that there aren't any decent distributions for gamers. Providing Steam, PlayOnLinux and a point and click installer for Minecraft helps on that score but I was hoping for more.

I would have expected there to be some default games included such as Frets On Fire and I would perhaps have expected some games emulators to be installed and configured by default.

For gaming Play Linux could perhaps include joystick calibration, one click installs for setting up WII remotes, XBOX controllers and OUYA controllers.

So my main conclusion is that the current alpha release of Play Linux is a good start but before moving to Beta perhaps it can include a little bit more.

Thankyou for reading





























An Everyday Linux User Review Of Play Linux

Introduction

When writing reviews I usually steer clear of distributions if they are not yet fully released. (i.e. if they are still in alpha or beta).

Recently however I have written articles about gaming within Linux and it just so happens I was asked to give Play Linux a go.

"Play Linux was built because there wasn't any good linux distribution made for gamers. Now there is."

The above quote can be found on the about page on the Play Linux website. I happen to know that this isn't totally true because I have more gaming distro reviews lined up in the coming weeks.

What Is Play Linux?

According to the Play Linux website:

Play Linux is a linux distro based on Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS optimized for gaming .
It combines the power of Linux with the simplicity of Ubuntu.
It comes with all GPU drivers and automatically enables your GPU!
You don't need to dual-boot anymore!

This review is therefore based on Play Linux's aims as opposed to necessarily stability as it is technically still an alpha release.

Installation

As Play Linux is based on Ubuntu the installation is a fairly straight forward affair.

I had a bit of an issue connecting to a wireless network in the live image but I think this was user error on my behalf rather than an issue with Play Linux.

I am used to entering the security key and that is about it, unless I am using the KDE desktop in which case there is the KDE wallet to deal with. Play Linux however requires you to enter a password before entering the wireless security code.

During the installation you will be asked to choose the installation language, decide whether you want to overwrite the existing operating system, install alongside or something else. You will also be asked to create a user. It is all fairly standard stuff.

First Impressions





















The default desktop environment for Play Linux is Cinnamon which is interesting because that puts it in direct competition with Linux Mint.

Cinnamon is very straight forward and whether you are from a Linux, Windows or even Mac background you will get to grips with it quite quickly.

By default the Cinnamon desktop has a panel at the bottom with a menu and quick launch icons to the left and system tray style icons to the right.

The icon set is quite interesting if a little disconcerting. For instance the icons in the quick launch area are "show desktop","Firefox","Terminal" and "Nemo". Is that a new Firefox icon?

The desktop wallpaper is a nice space theme but if you want to change it you can do so easily by right clicking on the desktop and choosing "Change desktop background".

As of yet there appear to be no other backgrounds or if there are the background changer doesn't default to the right location.

You can easily add your own wallpapers or you can go to a web browser, find the image you wish to use, right click and choose set as default wallpaper.





















It is amazing how good you can make your desktop look with the right picture.

Connecting to the internet

Choosing a network is as simple as clicking the network icon in the system tray and selecting the one you wish to use.





















As I mentioned earlier in the piece connecting to the internet caused me some confusion at first as I was busy typing in the network security code when I was asked to enter my user's password.

Once I got over that hurdle I was able to enter the network security key and connect to the internet.
 


Flash and MP3



























Flash works perfectly well within Play Linux although as you may be aware Flash is no longer being actively developed for Linux and so if you really want updated versions you need to use Chrome.

For more information on that visit read this article at Computerworld.





























MP3 audio files also play perfectly within Play Linux.

To be honest I am thinking of dropping this section from the review because it is very rare for distributions not to include the multimedia codecs anymore and they are easy to install even if they are missing.

This section does give me the license though to show some of my favourite Youtube videos and link to my favourite Flash based games.

Applications

This is the section that should set Play Linux apart as it is built for gaming and therefore should provide a good set of games or the tools required to play games.

Games

Graphics

  • GIMP - Image editing
  • ImageMagick - Image editing

Internet

  • Empathy - Messenging
  • Firefox - Web Browser
  • Kosmos - Package Manager

Office

  • LibreOffice Writer
  • LibreOffice Calc
  • LibreOffice Impress
  • LibreOffice Draw
  • LibreOffice Math
  • LibreOffice Base

Sound/Video

  • Spotify
  • VLC

Other

  • WINE - Run Windows applications and games within Linux
Few people would argue with the inclusions of Firefox, LibreOffice and GIMP as these are commonly distributed with Linux distributions.

The key decisions made include the lack of a dedicated audio player and instead the inclusion of Spotify and the inclusion of the Kosmos application.

Steam and PlayOnLinux were to be expected as this is a distribution dedicated to gamers.



Kosmos is the central place where you can set up things unique to Play Linux. The Kosmos isn't that big as yet but under the games section you will find an installer for Minecraft which will be of interest to some of you.






I think including Minecraft is a good idea as my guide for running Minecraft in Ubuntu is one of the most popular on this site and Play Linux removes the requirement for this guide as it is simply a one click installation.

Under the GPU section within Kosmos you will find graphics drivers for AMD and NVidia.




The internet section provides a choice of different browsers as well as Skype.

That really is about is for Kosmos at the moment. It will probably grow as Play Linux grows but it is fairly light in terms of functionality at the moment.



Spotify was just not playing ball for me and although it runs it just wouldn't return any results. It also wouldn't allow me to resize the window.

Steam is installed by default, well kind of. It is the Steam installer and so as soon as you click on the icon you have to wait for 200+ megabytes of updates to be installed. This isn't Play Linux's fault but rather a characteristic of Steam.

PlayOnLinux is installed as well as Steam and hopefully you have followed my guides for playing DOS games using PlayOnLinux and Windows games using PlayOnLinux.

Installing Applications



If the application you need isn't already installed, you can install it via the Ubuntu Software Centre.

Simply browse by category or use the search option to filter by title or keywords.

Summary

Play Linux is built on top of Ubuntu and because it utilises the Cinnamon desktop it is easy to install and easy to use.

Play Linux needs something to set it apart from Ubuntu, Linux Mint and Zorin and the way it is trying to do this is by providing the applications people want that aren't ordinarily installed such as Steam, PlayOnLinux, Spotify and Minecraft.

I found Play Linux to be fairly stable although I had a few minor issues such as Spotify not working and my keyboard layout defaulting to US English despite choosing UK English during the installation.

Here is the thing. Play Linux's website states that there aren't any decent distributions for gamers. Providing Steam, PlayOnLinux and a point and click installer for Minecraft helps on that score but I was hoping for more.

I would have expected there to be some default games included such as Frets On Fire and I would perhaps have expected some games emulators to be installed and configured by default.

For gaming Play Linux could perhaps include joystick calibration, one click installs for setting up WII remotes, XBOX controllers and OUYA controllers.

So my main conclusion is that the current alpha release of Play Linux is a good start but before moving to Beta perhaps it can include a little bit more.

Thankyou for reading





























Posted at 22:51 |  by Gary Newell

Saturday, 27 September 2014

Introduction

This post just highlights some of the other articles that I have been writing at linux.about.com.

Every week I have started writing a news roundup highlighting Linux based articles that I think will be useful to the wider community including general news and tutorials.

In addition I have started setting the scene for new Linux users by showing how to set up Linux in a virtual machine, how to use the Unity Launcher and Dashboard and by providing a list of things to do after installing Linux.

I have focussed on Ubuntu to start with as that is one of the easier distributions to get used to but the articles will become more and more generic for other distributions and there will be some more technical stuff as time goes on.

How to fix the BASH Shellshock Bug

The big news of the week is the major bug in BASH that could leave your system vulnerable to attack.

Most home Linux users probably wouldn't fall foul of this bug as it requires access to the shell in the first place but you should patch your systems and keep them up to date anyway.

About Linux Weekly News

15th September 2014 - The End Of The Road For Bodhi

Jeff Hoogland had announced that he was taking a less active role in Bodhi Linux and therefore it was predicted that Bodhi would stop being developed.

Another big story was the news that Turin would be swapping Windows XP for Ubuntu.

Matt Hartley discussed the myths that often touted about Linux and Dedoimedo looked at Plasma 5.

Also in the weekly news that week were guides showing how to set up a command line Twitter client and how to set up SSH using Linux.


22nd September 2014 - Bodhi's Demise Greatly Exaggerated

A week is a long time in Linux. Jeff Hoogland announced that Bodhi was not going to be coming to an end and that new people had stepped forward to help with the project.

Dedoimedo asked the question "Has the Linux arena become boring?". Read the news roundup and then the article and then come back here and comment.

Datamation had an article questioning the viability of Linux gaming as many games developers are seeing less than adequate sales growth from the Linux platform.

In a week that included Microsoft buying Minecraft the news was a bit doom and gloom but there was a positive upbeat as it is unlikely that Minecraft will cease to exist on the Linux platform.

Tutorials included links to the PlayOnLinux articles found on this site and how to install and run Android applications on your Linux computer.


How To Guides

How to install Ubuntu in a virtual machine using Windows


If you have Windows and you want to try Linux out for the first time then trying Ubuntu out in a virtual machine might be a good start.

30 things to do after installing Ubuntu


After you have installed Ubuntu you might be wondering what you should do next. This article has 30 items of which some of them must be done and others are nice to haves.

The first few items actually look at learning how to use Ubuntu whereas later on it looks at setting up things like Skype, Dropbox and Netflix.

The final few steps are more about support and further development and also a little bit about entertainment such as listening to the Ubuntu UK Podcast.

The complete guide to the Unity Launcher


Ubuntu's Unity desktop might be confusing for new users. This article shows you how the launcher works including how to set up new launcher icons, what all the symbols mean, why the icons flash sometimes and how to hide the launcher altogether.

The complete guide to the Unity Dash


Having learned how to use the Unity Launcher the next step is to understand the Dash.

This guide looks at all the different scopes, how to filter the scopes and how to integrate online accounts and various other applications into the Dash.

How to choose a distribution


This week has been a bit fraught for System Admins with the Shellshock bug coming to the fore. One thing that has become prevalent is that it is important to know how well your system is supported.

This guide takes a unique twist on the way you might decide to choose the best Linux distribution by looking at distributions in a tree type structure where the top of the tree is the base distribution and the branches are derivatives. The further you get from the top of the tree the harder it is to keep up to date and get support.





8 Linux News Articles and How To Guides

Introduction

This post just highlights some of the other articles that I have been writing at linux.about.com.

Every week I have started writing a news roundup highlighting Linux based articles that I think will be useful to the wider community including general news and tutorials.

In addition I have started setting the scene for new Linux users by showing how to set up Linux in a virtual machine, how to use the Unity Launcher and Dashboard and by providing a list of things to do after installing Linux.

I have focussed on Ubuntu to start with as that is one of the easier distributions to get used to but the articles will become more and more generic for other distributions and there will be some more technical stuff as time goes on.

How to fix the BASH Shellshock Bug

The big news of the week is the major bug in BASH that could leave your system vulnerable to attack.

Most home Linux users probably wouldn't fall foul of this bug as it requires access to the shell in the first place but you should patch your systems and keep them up to date anyway.

About Linux Weekly News

15th September 2014 - The End Of The Road For Bodhi

Jeff Hoogland had announced that he was taking a less active role in Bodhi Linux and therefore it was predicted that Bodhi would stop being developed.

Another big story was the news that Turin would be swapping Windows XP for Ubuntu.

Matt Hartley discussed the myths that often touted about Linux and Dedoimedo looked at Plasma 5.

Also in the weekly news that week were guides showing how to set up a command line Twitter client and how to set up SSH using Linux.


22nd September 2014 - Bodhi's Demise Greatly Exaggerated

A week is a long time in Linux. Jeff Hoogland announced that Bodhi was not going to be coming to an end and that new people had stepped forward to help with the project.

Dedoimedo asked the question "Has the Linux arena become boring?". Read the news roundup and then the article and then come back here and comment.

Datamation had an article questioning the viability of Linux gaming as many games developers are seeing less than adequate sales growth from the Linux platform.

In a week that included Microsoft buying Minecraft the news was a bit doom and gloom but there was a positive upbeat as it is unlikely that Minecraft will cease to exist on the Linux platform.

Tutorials included links to the PlayOnLinux articles found on this site and how to install and run Android applications on your Linux computer.


How To Guides

How to install Ubuntu in a virtual machine using Windows


If you have Windows and you want to try Linux out for the first time then trying Ubuntu out in a virtual machine might be a good start.

30 things to do after installing Ubuntu


After you have installed Ubuntu you might be wondering what you should do next. This article has 30 items of which some of them must be done and others are nice to haves.

The first few items actually look at learning how to use Ubuntu whereas later on it looks at setting up things like Skype, Dropbox and Netflix.

The final few steps are more about support and further development and also a little bit about entertainment such as listening to the Ubuntu UK Podcast.

The complete guide to the Unity Launcher


Ubuntu's Unity desktop might be confusing for new users. This article shows you how the launcher works including how to set up new launcher icons, what all the symbols mean, why the icons flash sometimes and how to hide the launcher altogether.

The complete guide to the Unity Dash


Having learned how to use the Unity Launcher the next step is to understand the Dash.

This guide looks at all the different scopes, how to filter the scopes and how to integrate online accounts and various other applications into the Dash.

How to choose a distribution


This week has been a bit fraught for System Admins with the Shellshock bug coming to the fore. One thing that has become prevalent is that it is important to know how well your system is supported.

This guide takes a unique twist on the way you might decide to choose the best Linux distribution by looking at distributions in a tree type structure where the top of the tree is the base distribution and the branches are derivatives. The further you get from the top of the tree the harder it is to keep up to date and get support.





Posted at 18:18 |  by Gary Newell

Wednesday, 24 September 2014

Introduction

Continuing with the series looking at retrogaming with Linux here is an article showing how to play classic Windows games using PlayOnLinux. (and this process will work with newer games as well).

PlayOnLinux

PlayOnLinux is available for most distros and can be installed via the resident graphical package manager such as the Software Centre, Software Manager, Yast or Synaptic.

PlayOnLinux provides a nice user interface that makes using WINE and DOSbox easier.









Installing Windows Games


This article is going to show how to install a game either from a CD/DVD or from a folder.

When you first load PlayOnLinux you will see a list of applications that you have already set up (and if you followed my guide to setting up DOS games within PlayOnLinux then you will have some).

To install a Windows game click on the "Install a program" link.



The installation screen has a list of categories that you can choose from. If you select the games category a list of games will appear.

It is worth checking down the list to see if the game you wish to install is there as it speeds up the process slightly.

Note that if you don't have access to either a CD/DVD or a downloaded program then you won't be able to install the game. There is a caviat to that because there are games listed via GOG.com which will take you through the process of buying the games and downloading them.

For this article we are going to install the game manually. In order to do so click "Install a non-listed program".


A welcome screen will appear but you can just press the Next button to move on.

You can now choose to install or update an existing installation. Generally you will want to click the install option but if you get half way through and there is an issue then you will be better off clicking the update as this saves creating another virtual drive.

For this guide select the install option and click Next.


Enter the name of the application you wish to install. For this tutorial I will be installing "Championship Manager 01/02" which is a classic football management game and probably the best I have ever played. 

The good news is that you can play it as well because EIDOS who created the game have allowed for it to be downloaded for free.


The game will be downloaded as an ISO. After downloading the ISO you can either burn it to a CD using Brasero and insert it into the drive or you can mount the ISO as if it is a CD.

To mount the ISO as if it is a CD open a terminal window and type the following:

sudo mount -o loop /path/to/ISO /cdrom

Of course if you have another game that you want to install insert the CD into the drive.

Click Next within the PlayOnLinux Wizard after entering the name of the game.





You now have the opportunity to choose the version of WINE to be used, configure WINE or install extra libraries.

If your game is pre-2001/2002 then it is possible that it was made for Windows ME or before and it may not work with Windows XP which is the default machine type for PlayOnLinux.

Championship Manager was built for Windows 98/ME and therefore the configure WINE checkbox needs to be checked.

Click Next to continue.




Before you can configure WINE you have to choose whether you are installing a 32-bit or 64-bit application.

All older games will be 32-bit but some modern games might be 64-bit.

For Championship Manager it is definitely 32-bit.  Click Next to continue.




The WINE configuration utility will now load. From the Applications tab change  the Windows version to something prior to Windows XP. 

Windows ME was a truly awful operating system but Championship Manager runs using it.

Click "OK" to continue.




This is the point where you choose where to install from. You can either choose the CD/DVD or you can select another file. The select another file option lets you choose from files stored elsewhere on your computer.

For Championship Manager I mounted the CD-ROM (I actually own the original disk but I am writing this guide as if I downloaded it as I know most people won't have the disk).

Select the CD-ROM and click Next.



After choosing the CD-Rom you will be required to choose the setup file in order to install the application.

Click the "Browse" button and navigate to the /cdrom folder on your computer and choose "Setup.exe". Click Next.





The game's installer should now kick in. Each game will have its own installer and generally it is the case of installing the same options as if you were installing it on Windows.









The setup for Championship Manager requires you to choose your installation language, accept the agreement, choose a destination folder, determine how many of the files to copy from the CD and select a program folder.

The game will be now be installed.

An important part of the installation is when it asks whether you want to install DirectX. The answer to that question is pretty much always no. WINE already has DirectX catered for.


After the installation has finished you will be asked to choose which program to create a shortcut for within PlayOnLinux.

Choose the correct program and click Next. For Championship Manager select the cm0102.exe file.

Note that this will create a shortcut on your desktop. If you would prefer not to have a shortcut click the "I don't want to make a shortcut" option.


Finally enter the name of the shortcut that will appear on your desktop.

That is it. You can run the game either from within PlayOnLinux or from the shortcut on the desktop.










And then there is trouble... 256 colours

Some games from prehistoric times required 256 colours and no more. There are ways to do this in Linux but it requires changing the XORG.conf file and restarting X which isn't ideal.

A workaround to this is to create a virtual machine and install a very basic version of Linux on it and then install PlayOnLinux and the game within the virtual machine.

You can then set the number of colours for the virtual machine to 256 colours.

Windows users might be smugly thinking that this is a lot of hassle to play a game but running DOS games and older Windows games is a nightmare using Windows 8 (virtually impossible in some cases).

Summary

PlayOnLinux and WINE are great for playing games within Linux and although Steam and GOG.com have done a great deal in trying to bring native games to Linux there will always be a place for WINE.

Thankyou for reading










How to play classic Windows games using PlayOnLinux

Introduction

Continuing with the series looking at retrogaming with Linux here is an article showing how to play classic Windows games using PlayOnLinux. (and this process will work with newer games as well).

PlayOnLinux

PlayOnLinux is available for most distros and can be installed via the resident graphical package manager such as the Software Centre, Software Manager, Yast or Synaptic.

PlayOnLinux provides a nice user interface that makes using WINE and DOSbox easier.









Installing Windows Games


This article is going to show how to install a game either from a CD/DVD or from a folder.

When you first load PlayOnLinux you will see a list of applications that you have already set up (and if you followed my guide to setting up DOS games within PlayOnLinux then you will have some).

To install a Windows game click on the "Install a program" link.



The installation screen has a list of categories that you can choose from. If you select the games category a list of games will appear.

It is worth checking down the list to see if the game you wish to install is there as it speeds up the process slightly.

Note that if you don't have access to either a CD/DVD or a downloaded program then you won't be able to install the game. There is a caviat to that because there are games listed via GOG.com which will take you through the process of buying the games and downloading them.

For this article we are going to install the game manually. In order to do so click "Install a non-listed program".


A welcome screen will appear but you can just press the Next button to move on.

You can now choose to install or update an existing installation. Generally you will want to click the install option but if you get half way through and there is an issue then you will be better off clicking the update as this saves creating another virtual drive.

For this guide select the install option and click Next.


Enter the name of the application you wish to install. For this tutorial I will be installing "Championship Manager 01/02" which is a classic football management game and probably the best I have ever played. 

The good news is that you can play it as well because EIDOS who created the game have allowed for it to be downloaded for free.


The game will be downloaded as an ISO. After downloading the ISO you can either burn it to a CD using Brasero and insert it into the drive or you can mount the ISO as if it is a CD.

To mount the ISO as if it is a CD open a terminal window and type the following:

sudo mount -o loop /path/to/ISO /cdrom

Of course if you have another game that you want to install insert the CD into the drive.

Click Next within the PlayOnLinux Wizard after entering the name of the game.





You now have the opportunity to choose the version of WINE to be used, configure WINE or install extra libraries.

If your game is pre-2001/2002 then it is possible that it was made for Windows ME or before and it may not work with Windows XP which is the default machine type for PlayOnLinux.

Championship Manager was built for Windows 98/ME and therefore the configure WINE checkbox needs to be checked.

Click Next to continue.




Before you can configure WINE you have to choose whether you are installing a 32-bit or 64-bit application.

All older games will be 32-bit but some modern games might be 64-bit.

For Championship Manager it is definitely 32-bit.  Click Next to continue.




The WINE configuration utility will now load. From the Applications tab change  the Windows version to something prior to Windows XP. 

Windows ME was a truly awful operating system but Championship Manager runs using it.

Click "OK" to continue.




This is the point where you choose where to install from. You can either choose the CD/DVD or you can select another file. The select another file option lets you choose from files stored elsewhere on your computer.

For Championship Manager I mounted the CD-ROM (I actually own the original disk but I am writing this guide as if I downloaded it as I know most people won't have the disk).

Select the CD-ROM and click Next.



After choosing the CD-Rom you will be required to choose the setup file in order to install the application.

Click the "Browse" button and navigate to the /cdrom folder on your computer and choose "Setup.exe". Click Next.





The game's installer should now kick in. Each game will have its own installer and generally it is the case of installing the same options as if you were installing it on Windows.









The setup for Championship Manager requires you to choose your installation language, accept the agreement, choose a destination folder, determine how many of the files to copy from the CD and select a program folder.

The game will be now be installed.

An important part of the installation is when it asks whether you want to install DirectX. The answer to that question is pretty much always no. WINE already has DirectX catered for.


After the installation has finished you will be asked to choose which program to create a shortcut for within PlayOnLinux.

Choose the correct program and click Next. For Championship Manager select the cm0102.exe file.

Note that this will create a shortcut on your desktop. If you would prefer not to have a shortcut click the "I don't want to make a shortcut" option.


Finally enter the name of the shortcut that will appear on your desktop.

That is it. You can run the game either from within PlayOnLinux or from the shortcut on the desktop.










And then there is trouble... 256 colours

Some games from prehistoric times required 256 colours and no more. There are ways to do this in Linux but it requires changing the XORG.conf file and restarting X which isn't ideal.

A workaround to this is to create a virtual machine and install a very basic version of Linux on it and then install PlayOnLinux and the game within the virtual machine.

You can then set the number of colours for the virtual machine to 256 colours.

Windows users might be smugly thinking that this is a lot of hassle to play a game but running DOS games and older Windows games is a nightmare using Windows 8 (virtually impossible in some cases).

Summary

PlayOnLinux and WINE are great for playing games within Linux and although Steam and GOG.com have done a great deal in trying to bring native games to Linux there will always be a place for WINE.

Thankyou for reading










Posted at 22:39 |  by Gary Newell

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