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Monday, 18 May 2015

Hi everyone.

You may have noticed that I haven't posted on this site for a while.

I started a new job about 6 weeks ago and it is taking up a huge amount of my time.

I am still writing 2 articles a week over at linux.about.com so if you like the articles that I write please hop over there and take a look.

Last week I wrote a review of Chromixium and a guide to installing it. I also have comparison articles of Ubuntu GNOME, Fedora and openSUSE as well as Unity vs GNOME.

I will get back to writing here more regularly again as soon as work settles down but until then please visit linux.about.com.

The articles are basically the same, it is just the place that has changed.

A Quick Update

Hi everyone.

You may have noticed that I haven't posted on this site for a while.

I started a new job about 6 weeks ago and it is taking up a huge amount of my time.

I am still writing 2 articles a week over at linux.about.com so if you like the articles that I write please hop over there and take a look.

Last week I wrote a review of Chromixium and a guide to installing it. I also have comparison articles of Ubuntu GNOME, Fedora and openSUSE as well as Unity vs GNOME.

I will get back to writing here more regularly again as soon as work settles down but until then please visit linux.about.com.

The articles are basically the same, it is just the place that has changed.

Posted at 22:36 |  by Gary Newell

Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Introduction

I have written dozens of tutorials over the past few years.

This article provides links to beginners guides to Linux, dual boot guides, guides for creating Linux USB drives, running Linux in a virtual machine, Linux installation guides, Linux customisation and application guides, Linux gaming guides, Raspberry PI guides, Chromebook guides and more.

Beginners Guides

This section lists a couple of articles to read before you jump in to installing Linux.

1. Top 10 Tips For Beginning Linux

This one is for those of you who are really new to Linux. It is a video created by CBT Nuggets highlighting 10 excellent tips for beginners.





2. 5 Things To Consider When Installing Linux For The First Time

This article highlights 5 things to consider when installing Linux for the first time such as working out which distribution to use, replacing or dual booting with Windows, backing up your current operating system, partitioning and of course why do you want to use Linux in the first place?

Windows Guides

3. How To Create A Recovery Drive For All Versions Of Windows

This guide shows how to create a recovery drive for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

This is useful for those of you planning to try dual booting Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu and even those of you who just want to make sure you can get your computer back working if something goes wrong.

Linux For Windows XP Users

4. How To Create A Bootable Linux DVD Using Windows XP

This guide for Windows XP users shows how to create a bootable Linux DVD (PCLinuxOS).

5. How To Create A Bootable Linux USB Drive Using Windows XP

This guide has been created for Windows XP users and shows how to create a bootable Linux USB drive (PCLinuxOS).

6. How To Backup Windows XP And Create A System Image

This guide shows how to backup Windows XP and how to create a system image.

7. Prepare Your Disks For Installing Linux Alongside Windows XP

This guide shows you how to shrink your Windows partition using Windows XP so that you can dual boot it with Linux.

8. How To Replace Windows XP With Lubuntu

Still running Windows XP? Why? It makes your machine slow and it is no longer supported.

Don't throw the machine away though. Try Lubuntu instead with this guide which includes step by step instructions and pictures to help you.




9. How To Dual Boot Windows XP And PCLinuxOS

OK, so you are still using Windows XP and you are really nervous about changing it now. Lets face it you are content with Windows XP and the only reason to change is the lack of support.

This guide shows how to dual boot Windows XP and PCLinuxOS so that you can get used to something new whilst still keeping the something old.





Linux For Windows Vista Users

10. How To Create A Bootable Linux DVD Using Windows Vista

Don't have a spare USB drive? This guide for Windows Vista users shows how to create a bootable Linux DVD. (PCLinuxOS).

11. How To Create A Bootable Linux USB Drive Using Windows Vista

This guide has been created for Windows Vista users and shows how to create a bootable Linux USB drive. (PCLinuxOS).






12. How To Backup Windows Vista And Create A System Image

This guide shows how to backup Windows Vista and how to create a system image.

13. Prepare Your Disks For Installing Linux Alongside Windows Vista

In order to dual boot Windows Vista alongside Linux you will need to prepare your disks by shrinking the Windows partition. This guide shows you how to do it.

14. How To Dual Boot Windows Vista And PCLinuxOS

Windows Vista is almost as dead as Windows XP and therefore this guide shows how to dual boot Windows Vista with PCLinuxOS so that you can get used to trying something new whilst keeping something old.

Linux For Windows 7 Users

15. The Ultimate Ubuntu And Windows 7 Dual Boot Guide

This guide shows you how to install Windows 7 and Ubuntu side by side with complete step by step instructions.

16. How To Replace Windows 7 With Linux Mint Without Touching Other Partitions

This guide shows how to replace Windows 7 with Linux Mint. The unique twist with this guide is that it shows you how to do it so that any recovery partitions and data partitions remain intact.




17. How To Recovery Windows 7 And Delete Ubuntu

If you have tried dual booting Windows and Ubuntu and just didn't like it follow this guide to get Windows back the way it was before you started.

18. How To Dual Boot Windows 7 And Linux Mint

This guide shows how to dual boot Windows 7 and Linux Mint using step by step instructions and images.






Linux For Windows 8 Users

19. How To Prepare Your Hard Drive For Dual Booting Windows 8.1 and Linux 

This guide shows how to shrink your Windows 8.1 partition in order to be able to dual boot with Linux.

20. How To Dual Boot Windows 8.1 And Fedora Linux

If you are looking to dual boot Fedora with your Windows 8.1 system then this guide will show you how to do that using step by step instructions and images.


21. How To Dual Boot Windows 8.1 And Linux Mint

One of the first distributions many people try is Linux Mint because it has the look and feel of Windows 7 and helps with familiarity.

This step by step guide shows how to dual boot Linux Mint with Windows 8.1.



22. 2 Ways To Fix The UEFI Bootloader When Dual Booting Windows 8.1 And Ubuntu

This guide provides two fixes for UEFI bootloader issues after installing Ubuntu alongside Windows 8.1.

23. The Ultimate Ubuntu And Windows 8.1 Dual Boot Guide

This guide shows you how to install Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu side by side with complete step by step instructions and screenshots.

The key is all in the creation of the USB drive.



Linux For MAC Users

24. How To Dual Boot Linux Mint And OSX On The MacBook Air

If you are an Apple user you are an Apple user, right? Well not necessarily. There is no reason you can't be an Apple user and a Linux user. 

This guide shows you how.

Customising Desktops

25. How To Customise The Cinnamon Desktop

The traditional desktops provide many customisable features and the Cinnamon desktop is indicative of a traditional desktop.

This guide shows how to add panels, add widgets and customise the login screen.



26. How To Customise The XFCE Desktop Environment

The XFCE desktop environment is probably the easiest to customise.

This guide shows how to add new panels, set up the cairo dock, install the Whisker menu and add slingscold for a nice dash style menu.



27. How To Customise The LXDE Desktop Environment

LXDE is a lightweight desktop environment which is every bit as customisable as XFCE.

This guide shows you the tips and tricks required to customise your LXDE desktop.



Creating Bootable USB Drives

28. How To Create A UEFI Bootable Ubuntu USB Drive

In order to boot Ubuntu on a machine currently running Windows 8.1 you will need to create a bootable USB drive.

This guide provides step by step instructions on how to create the USB drive and is required for the dual boot guide.

29. How To Create A Bootable openSUSE USB Drive 

In order to be able to try out openSUSE and install it you will need to download the ISO and create either a DVD or USB drive.

This step by step guide shows how to create a bootable openSUSE USB drive.

30. How To Create A Bootable Fedora USB Drive

Before you can install Fedora you will need to either create a Fedora DVD or USB drive.

This step by step guide shows you how to do just that.





31. How To Create A Bootable Linux Mint USB Drive

Before you can install Linux Mint you will need to either create a DVD or USB drive.

This step by step guide shows how to install Linux Mint on a USB drive.




32. 3 Ways To Create A Xubuntu USB Drive

This guide provides 3 different methods for creating a Xubuntu USB drive including using the Universal USB Installer, Ubuntu's Startup Disk Creator and UNetbootin.

33. How To Create A Puppy Linux USB Drive

Puppy Linux is a great distribution which works incredibly well on older computers and is designed to run from a pen drive.

This guide shows the best method for installing Puppy Linux to a USB drive.




34. How To Create A Lubuntu Live CD And USB

Before installing Lubuntu you will need to create a CD or USB drive. This guide provides step by step instructions for doing both.

35. How To Create A Bootable Linux Mint USB Drive

This guide shows how to create a bootable Linux Mint USB drive using step by step instructions.

36. How To Create A Bootable Linux USB Drive Using UNetbootin

When I first started using Linux UNetbootin was the tool everyone used to create bootable USB drives.

Nowadays there are many more applications which can be used.

Here is a guide to using UNetbootin for creating bootable Linux USB drives.

Install Guides

37. How To Install Fedora Linux

Just one of many installation guides, this provides step by step instructions to using the Anaconda installer for installing Fedora Linux.






38. A Step By Step Guide To Installing openSUSE

This guide shows how to install openSUSE using step by step instructions.

The openSUSE installer isn't the easiest to follow and hopefully this guide will help you through the rough patches.

39. A Step By Step Guide To Installing Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a great distribution for those of you who like to tweak things. The preinstalled applications are kept to a minimum and with the Ubuntu repositories available there are a plethora of ways you can make it your own.

This guide shows how to install Xubuntu.



40. How To Replace Your Operating System With Zorin 9

Zorin OS is a great operating system for Windows users who are thinking of trying Linux for the first time because it mimics the Windows interface.

This guide shows how to replace Windows with Zorin.



41. How To Install Peppermint Linux

Peppermint Linux takes cloud computing to the desktop by integrating web applications into the main interface.

This guide shows how to install Peppermint Linux.





Raspberry PI

42. How To Set Up The Raspberry PI 2

The Raspberry PI version 2 has made the impossible possible. This little device is now many times better than the original version yet still at the same price point.

This guide shows how to setup the Raspberry PI.


43. How To Turn Your Raspberry PI Into A DAAP Server

The Raspberry PI is a magnificent feat of engineering and for under £30 you can adapt it to be pretty much whatever you want it to be.

In this case the Raspberry PI is turned into a DAAP server which lets you serve music to all of your devices as long as they are capable of running DAAP clients.

Not sure if your device can be a DAAP client? Think iPods, iPads, MacBooks, Android phones, Android tablets, Windows media player, iTunes, Rhythmbox, Banshee and many other applications and devices.



44. How To Connect To The Raspberry PI From The HP Chromebook

This guide shows how to connect to the Raspberry PI from the HP Chromebook using SSH and VNC.






45. How To Setup Wordpress On The Raspberry PI

This guide shows you how to setup Wordpress on the Raspberry PI.

You will need to follow my guide for setting up a webserver and installing MySQL in order to follow this guide.



46. Connecting To The Raspberry PI From The Outside World 

This guide shows how you can connect to your Raspberry PI from your office or from the local coffee shop by setting up port forwarding and getting an external IP address.

47. Setting Up A Personal Web Server On The Raspberry PI

This guide shows you how to install Lighttpd, PHP and MySQL in order to set up your Raspberry PI and a web server.





48. How To Connect Via VNC To The Raspberry PI From An Android Tablet

This guide shows how to install a VNC server on the Raspberry PI and how to connect to it from an Android tablet.

49. How To RIP Music From Online Radio Stations Using The Raspberry PI

This guide shows you how to use streamripper to record the audio streams from online radio stations.
It even splits the tracks and cuts out the adverts.

Chromebooks

50. How To Install Minecraft On The HP Chromebook

This guide shows how to install Minecraft on the HP Chromebook.

In order to follow this guide you will need to have installed Ubuntu on the Chromebook.




51. How To Install Ubuntu On The HP Chromebook

This guide shows how to use Crouton to install Ubuntu on the HP Chromebook.







52. How To Create Recovery Media For The HP Chromebook

Before installing Ubuntu and modifying the HP Chromebook in any way it is a good idea to create recovery media so that you can always get it back to the way it was before you started messing with it.


This guide shows you how to do just that.

Virtual Machines

53. How To Use GNOME Boxes 

This guide shows how to use GNOME boxes to run multiple operating systems on one computer.

This is useful for testing out different Linux distributions or trying out new features without messing up your main computer.

54. A Step By Step Guide To Installing Ubuntu Using VirtualBox

This guide shows you how to install Ubuntu on top of Windows using Oracle's Virtualbox.

This is a great place to start if you are unsure as to whether Linux is for you or not.




55. How To Install Makulu Linux In VirtualBox

Makulu Linux is a really nice alternative distribution with great artwork and a really decent set of applications pre-installed.

This guide shows you how to try it using Oracle's Virtualbox.





56. How To Install Linux Mint Within Windows Using VirtualBox

This guide shows how to install Linux Mint within Windows using Oracle's Virtualbox software.






Other

57. Fedora GNOME Keyboard Shortcuts



After installing Fedora Linux you will need to know how to navigate the GNOME desktop.

This guides provides a list of useful keyboard shortcuts for negotiating GNOME.


58. How To Install Flash, Steam and MP3 Codecs Using Fedora Linux

Fedora Linux is a community distribution and as such only ships with free software.

This guide shows how to install Flash, Steam and the codecs necessary for playing MP3 audio within Fedora.

59. How To Navigate The Debian Website

This guide shows 4 ways to download Debian.

It isn't as easy as it looks, there are so many different options. This guide was designed to help make the download process easier.




60. How To Install Flash, Steam and MP3 Codecs Using openSUSE

As with Fedora, openSUSE only ships with free software. This guide shows the methods for installing Flash, Steam and MP3 codecs whilst using openSUSE.

61. A Beginners Guide To The Evolution Mail Client

For those of you who like a mail client which resembles Microsoft Outlook, Evolution is the perfect choice.

This guide shows how to setup a use Evolution.




62. The Complete Guide To Rhythmbox

Rhythmbox is the ultimate audio player for Linux.

This guide shows how to import audio, create playlists, set up a DAAP server and import podcasts.






63. How To Install Chrome, Java, Skype, Dropbox and Minecraft Within Fedora

This guide shows how to install 5 modern essential applications within Fedora Linux.

By the time you have these installed your Linux desktop will be complete.






64. Use Linux To Reset A Windows Password

This guide shows a number of different ways to reset a Windows password using Linux including cracking the password or just resetting it from the command line.






65. How To Use ClamAV To Clear Windows Viruses

This guide shows how to use the ClamAV antivirus package to clear viruses from the Windows partition on a computer.

Install ClamAV to a live USB drive and you can fix viruses on any machine anywhere.




66. Learn Ubuntu - How To Connect To The Internet

New users tend to go for Linux Mint or Ubuntu. If you are a new Ubuntu user you might find some of the simple tasks difficult if you don't know where to look.

This guide helps you to connect to the internet using Ubuntu.




67. How To Run Linux Applications From The Terminal In The Background

This short guide shows how to run Linux terminal commands in the background so that you can continue to run multiple command line applications at the same time.






68. Learn Ubuntu - The Unity Launcher

After installing Ubuntu you will want to get to grips with how the desktop works.

This guide shows you how the launcher works including opening applications, adding and removing programs and the different symbols and their meanings.








69. Learn Ubuntu - The Unity Dash

When you have finished reading about the Unity launcher it is time to move on to the Dash which is used for finding, running and integrating applications within Ubuntu.




70. How To Install The Sims 3 Within Ubuntu

This guide shows how to use PlayOnLinux to install "The Sims 3" within Ubuntu.







71. How To Play Classic Windows Games Using PlayOnLinux

This guide shows how to play classic Windows games within Linux using PlayOnLinux.

The guide includes full step by step instructions and highlights a few intricacies.






72. How To Play Classic DOS Games Using DOSBox

This guide shows how to use DOSBox to play classic games such as Prince Of Persia and Sim City 2000.









73. How To Play Classic DOS Games Using PlayOnLinux

This guide shows how to play classic DOS games using PlayOnLinux as opposed to DOSBox. I prefer to use this method over using DOSBox.

74. Retrogaming With Linux

This guide shows some nice little tricks for playing classic games within Linux such as using modern joysticks in such a way that they aren't too slick for older games.

75. How To Convert MP3 To WAV and WAV To MP3

This guide shows you how to convert from MP3 to WAV and WAV to MP3.

We are all used to converting from CD audio to MP3. (Actually younger people might not because they are used to downloading). The rest of us have a CD collection. This guide shows how to convert from CD audio to MP3.

Sometimes you want to convert from MP3 to WAV so that you can copy the songs to a CD for playing in the car. This guide shows how to do that as well.

76. 16 Ways To Beat Cryptolocker And Ransomware

Ransomware threatened to become a big thing a few years ago with ordinary users and large companies being forced to pay unethical conmen to get access to their own data after it was encrypted by nasty software. Pay up or never get your data back.

This guide provides 16 ways to beat Cryptolocker and Ransomware.

76 Everyday Linux User Guides For Beginners

Introduction

I have written dozens of tutorials over the past few years.

This article provides links to beginners guides to Linux, dual boot guides, guides for creating Linux USB drives, running Linux in a virtual machine, Linux installation guides, Linux customisation and application guides, Linux gaming guides, Raspberry PI guides, Chromebook guides and more.

Beginners Guides

This section lists a couple of articles to read before you jump in to installing Linux.

1. Top 10 Tips For Beginning Linux

This one is for those of you who are really new to Linux. It is a video created by CBT Nuggets highlighting 10 excellent tips for beginners.





2. 5 Things To Consider When Installing Linux For The First Time

This article highlights 5 things to consider when installing Linux for the first time such as working out which distribution to use, replacing or dual booting with Windows, backing up your current operating system, partitioning and of course why do you want to use Linux in the first place?

Windows Guides

3. How To Create A Recovery Drive For All Versions Of Windows

This guide shows how to create a recovery drive for Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

This is useful for those of you planning to try dual booting Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu and even those of you who just want to make sure you can get your computer back working if something goes wrong.

Linux For Windows XP Users

4. How To Create A Bootable Linux DVD Using Windows XP

This guide for Windows XP users shows how to create a bootable Linux DVD (PCLinuxOS).

5. How To Create A Bootable Linux USB Drive Using Windows XP

This guide has been created for Windows XP users and shows how to create a bootable Linux USB drive (PCLinuxOS).

6. How To Backup Windows XP And Create A System Image

This guide shows how to backup Windows XP and how to create a system image.

7. Prepare Your Disks For Installing Linux Alongside Windows XP

This guide shows you how to shrink your Windows partition using Windows XP so that you can dual boot it with Linux.

8. How To Replace Windows XP With Lubuntu

Still running Windows XP? Why? It makes your machine slow and it is no longer supported.

Don't throw the machine away though. Try Lubuntu instead with this guide which includes step by step instructions and pictures to help you.




9. How To Dual Boot Windows XP And PCLinuxOS

OK, so you are still using Windows XP and you are really nervous about changing it now. Lets face it you are content with Windows XP and the only reason to change is the lack of support.

This guide shows how to dual boot Windows XP and PCLinuxOS so that you can get used to something new whilst still keeping the something old.





Linux For Windows Vista Users

10. How To Create A Bootable Linux DVD Using Windows Vista

Don't have a spare USB drive? This guide for Windows Vista users shows how to create a bootable Linux DVD. (PCLinuxOS).

11. How To Create A Bootable Linux USB Drive Using Windows Vista

This guide has been created for Windows Vista users and shows how to create a bootable Linux USB drive. (PCLinuxOS).






12. How To Backup Windows Vista And Create A System Image

This guide shows how to backup Windows Vista and how to create a system image.

13. Prepare Your Disks For Installing Linux Alongside Windows Vista

In order to dual boot Windows Vista alongside Linux you will need to prepare your disks by shrinking the Windows partition. This guide shows you how to do it.

14. How To Dual Boot Windows Vista And PCLinuxOS

Windows Vista is almost as dead as Windows XP and therefore this guide shows how to dual boot Windows Vista with PCLinuxOS so that you can get used to trying something new whilst keeping something old.

Linux For Windows 7 Users

15. The Ultimate Ubuntu And Windows 7 Dual Boot Guide

This guide shows you how to install Windows 7 and Ubuntu side by side with complete step by step instructions.

16. How To Replace Windows 7 With Linux Mint Without Touching Other Partitions

This guide shows how to replace Windows 7 with Linux Mint. The unique twist with this guide is that it shows you how to do it so that any recovery partitions and data partitions remain intact.




17. How To Recovery Windows 7 And Delete Ubuntu

If you have tried dual booting Windows and Ubuntu and just didn't like it follow this guide to get Windows back the way it was before you started.

18. How To Dual Boot Windows 7 And Linux Mint

This guide shows how to dual boot Windows 7 and Linux Mint using step by step instructions and images.






Linux For Windows 8 Users

19. How To Prepare Your Hard Drive For Dual Booting Windows 8.1 and Linux 

This guide shows how to shrink your Windows 8.1 partition in order to be able to dual boot with Linux.

20. How To Dual Boot Windows 8.1 And Fedora Linux

If you are looking to dual boot Fedora with your Windows 8.1 system then this guide will show you how to do that using step by step instructions and images.


21. How To Dual Boot Windows 8.1 And Linux Mint

One of the first distributions many people try is Linux Mint because it has the look and feel of Windows 7 and helps with familiarity.

This step by step guide shows how to dual boot Linux Mint with Windows 8.1.



22. 2 Ways To Fix The UEFI Bootloader When Dual Booting Windows 8.1 And Ubuntu

This guide provides two fixes for UEFI bootloader issues after installing Ubuntu alongside Windows 8.1.

23. The Ultimate Ubuntu And Windows 8.1 Dual Boot Guide

This guide shows you how to install Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu side by side with complete step by step instructions and screenshots.

The key is all in the creation of the USB drive.



Linux For MAC Users

24. How To Dual Boot Linux Mint And OSX On The MacBook Air

If you are an Apple user you are an Apple user, right? Well not necessarily. There is no reason you can't be an Apple user and a Linux user. 

This guide shows you how.

Customising Desktops

25. How To Customise The Cinnamon Desktop

The traditional desktops provide many customisable features and the Cinnamon desktop is indicative of a traditional desktop.

This guide shows how to add panels, add widgets and customise the login screen.



26. How To Customise The XFCE Desktop Environment

The XFCE desktop environment is probably the easiest to customise.

This guide shows how to add new panels, set up the cairo dock, install the Whisker menu and add slingscold for a nice dash style menu.



27. How To Customise The LXDE Desktop Environment

LXDE is a lightweight desktop environment which is every bit as customisable as XFCE.

This guide shows you the tips and tricks required to customise your LXDE desktop.



Creating Bootable USB Drives

28. How To Create A UEFI Bootable Ubuntu USB Drive

In order to boot Ubuntu on a machine currently running Windows 8.1 you will need to create a bootable USB drive.

This guide provides step by step instructions on how to create the USB drive and is required for the dual boot guide.

29. How To Create A Bootable openSUSE USB Drive 

In order to be able to try out openSUSE and install it you will need to download the ISO and create either a DVD or USB drive.

This step by step guide shows how to create a bootable openSUSE USB drive.

30. How To Create A Bootable Fedora USB Drive

Before you can install Fedora you will need to either create a Fedora DVD or USB drive.

This step by step guide shows you how to do just that.





31. How To Create A Bootable Linux Mint USB Drive

Before you can install Linux Mint you will need to either create a DVD or USB drive.

This step by step guide shows how to install Linux Mint on a USB drive.




32. 3 Ways To Create A Xubuntu USB Drive

This guide provides 3 different methods for creating a Xubuntu USB drive including using the Universal USB Installer, Ubuntu's Startup Disk Creator and UNetbootin.

33. How To Create A Puppy Linux USB Drive

Puppy Linux is a great distribution which works incredibly well on older computers and is designed to run from a pen drive.

This guide shows the best method for installing Puppy Linux to a USB drive.




34. How To Create A Lubuntu Live CD And USB

Before installing Lubuntu you will need to create a CD or USB drive. This guide provides step by step instructions for doing both.

35. How To Create A Bootable Linux Mint USB Drive

This guide shows how to create a bootable Linux Mint USB drive using step by step instructions.

36. How To Create A Bootable Linux USB Drive Using UNetbootin

When I first started using Linux UNetbootin was the tool everyone used to create bootable USB drives.

Nowadays there are many more applications which can be used.

Here is a guide to using UNetbootin for creating bootable Linux USB drives.

Install Guides

37. How To Install Fedora Linux

Just one of many installation guides, this provides step by step instructions to using the Anaconda installer for installing Fedora Linux.






38. A Step By Step Guide To Installing openSUSE

This guide shows how to install openSUSE using step by step instructions.

The openSUSE installer isn't the easiest to follow and hopefully this guide will help you through the rough patches.

39. A Step By Step Guide To Installing Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a great distribution for those of you who like to tweak things. The preinstalled applications are kept to a minimum and with the Ubuntu repositories available there are a plethora of ways you can make it your own.

This guide shows how to install Xubuntu.



40. How To Replace Your Operating System With Zorin 9

Zorin OS is a great operating system for Windows users who are thinking of trying Linux for the first time because it mimics the Windows interface.

This guide shows how to replace Windows with Zorin.



41. How To Install Peppermint Linux

Peppermint Linux takes cloud computing to the desktop by integrating web applications into the main interface.

This guide shows how to install Peppermint Linux.





Raspberry PI

42. How To Set Up The Raspberry PI 2

The Raspberry PI version 2 has made the impossible possible. This little device is now many times better than the original version yet still at the same price point.

This guide shows how to setup the Raspberry PI.


43. How To Turn Your Raspberry PI Into A DAAP Server

The Raspberry PI is a magnificent feat of engineering and for under £30 you can adapt it to be pretty much whatever you want it to be.

In this case the Raspberry PI is turned into a DAAP server which lets you serve music to all of your devices as long as they are capable of running DAAP clients.

Not sure if your device can be a DAAP client? Think iPods, iPads, MacBooks, Android phones, Android tablets, Windows media player, iTunes, Rhythmbox, Banshee and many other applications and devices.



44. How To Connect To The Raspberry PI From The HP Chromebook

This guide shows how to connect to the Raspberry PI from the HP Chromebook using SSH and VNC.






45. How To Setup Wordpress On The Raspberry PI

This guide shows you how to setup Wordpress on the Raspberry PI.

You will need to follow my guide for setting up a webserver and installing MySQL in order to follow this guide.



46. Connecting To The Raspberry PI From The Outside World 

This guide shows how you can connect to your Raspberry PI from your office or from the local coffee shop by setting up port forwarding and getting an external IP address.

47. Setting Up A Personal Web Server On The Raspberry PI

This guide shows you how to install Lighttpd, PHP and MySQL in order to set up your Raspberry PI and a web server.





48. How To Connect Via VNC To The Raspberry PI From An Android Tablet

This guide shows how to install a VNC server on the Raspberry PI and how to connect to it from an Android tablet.

49. How To RIP Music From Online Radio Stations Using The Raspberry PI

This guide shows you how to use streamripper to record the audio streams from online radio stations.
It even splits the tracks and cuts out the adverts.

Chromebooks

50. How To Install Minecraft On The HP Chromebook

This guide shows how to install Minecraft on the HP Chromebook.

In order to follow this guide you will need to have installed Ubuntu on the Chromebook.




51. How To Install Ubuntu On The HP Chromebook

This guide shows how to use Crouton to install Ubuntu on the HP Chromebook.







52. How To Create Recovery Media For The HP Chromebook

Before installing Ubuntu and modifying the HP Chromebook in any way it is a good idea to create recovery media so that you can always get it back to the way it was before you started messing with it.


This guide shows you how to do just that.

Virtual Machines

53. How To Use GNOME Boxes 

This guide shows how to use GNOME boxes to run multiple operating systems on one computer.

This is useful for testing out different Linux distributions or trying out new features without messing up your main computer.

54. A Step By Step Guide To Installing Ubuntu Using VirtualBox

This guide shows you how to install Ubuntu on top of Windows using Oracle's Virtualbox.

This is a great place to start if you are unsure as to whether Linux is for you or not.




55. How To Install Makulu Linux In VirtualBox

Makulu Linux is a really nice alternative distribution with great artwork and a really decent set of applications pre-installed.

This guide shows you how to try it using Oracle's Virtualbox.





56. How To Install Linux Mint Within Windows Using VirtualBox

This guide shows how to install Linux Mint within Windows using Oracle's Virtualbox software.






Other

57. Fedora GNOME Keyboard Shortcuts



After installing Fedora Linux you will need to know how to navigate the GNOME desktop.

This guides provides a list of useful keyboard shortcuts for negotiating GNOME.


58. How To Install Flash, Steam and MP3 Codecs Using Fedora Linux

Fedora Linux is a community distribution and as such only ships with free software.

This guide shows how to install Flash, Steam and the codecs necessary for playing MP3 audio within Fedora.

59. How To Navigate The Debian Website

This guide shows 4 ways to download Debian.

It isn't as easy as it looks, there are so many different options. This guide was designed to help make the download process easier.




60. How To Install Flash, Steam and MP3 Codecs Using openSUSE

As with Fedora, openSUSE only ships with free software. This guide shows the methods for installing Flash, Steam and MP3 codecs whilst using openSUSE.

61. A Beginners Guide To The Evolution Mail Client

For those of you who like a mail client which resembles Microsoft Outlook, Evolution is the perfect choice.

This guide shows how to setup a use Evolution.




62. The Complete Guide To Rhythmbox

Rhythmbox is the ultimate audio player for Linux.

This guide shows how to import audio, create playlists, set up a DAAP server and import podcasts.






63. How To Install Chrome, Java, Skype, Dropbox and Minecraft Within Fedora

This guide shows how to install 5 modern essential applications within Fedora Linux.

By the time you have these installed your Linux desktop will be complete.






64. Use Linux To Reset A Windows Password

This guide shows a number of different ways to reset a Windows password using Linux including cracking the password or just resetting it from the command line.






65. How To Use ClamAV To Clear Windows Viruses

This guide shows how to use the ClamAV antivirus package to clear viruses from the Windows partition on a computer.

Install ClamAV to a live USB drive and you can fix viruses on any machine anywhere.




66. Learn Ubuntu - How To Connect To The Internet

New users tend to go for Linux Mint or Ubuntu. If you are a new Ubuntu user you might find some of the simple tasks difficult if you don't know where to look.

This guide helps you to connect to the internet using Ubuntu.




67. How To Run Linux Applications From The Terminal In The Background

This short guide shows how to run Linux terminal commands in the background so that you can continue to run multiple command line applications at the same time.






68. Learn Ubuntu - The Unity Launcher

After installing Ubuntu you will want to get to grips with how the desktop works.

This guide shows you how the launcher works including opening applications, adding and removing programs and the different symbols and their meanings.








69. Learn Ubuntu - The Unity Dash

When you have finished reading about the Unity launcher it is time to move on to the Dash which is used for finding, running and integrating applications within Ubuntu.




70. How To Install The Sims 3 Within Ubuntu

This guide shows how to use PlayOnLinux to install "The Sims 3" within Ubuntu.







71. How To Play Classic Windows Games Using PlayOnLinux

This guide shows how to play classic Windows games within Linux using PlayOnLinux.

The guide includes full step by step instructions and highlights a few intricacies.






72. How To Play Classic DOS Games Using DOSBox

This guide shows how to use DOSBox to play classic games such as Prince Of Persia and Sim City 2000.









73. How To Play Classic DOS Games Using PlayOnLinux

This guide shows how to play classic DOS games using PlayOnLinux as opposed to DOSBox. I prefer to use this method over using DOSBox.

74. Retrogaming With Linux

This guide shows some nice little tricks for playing classic games within Linux such as using modern joysticks in such a way that they aren't too slick for older games.

75. How To Convert MP3 To WAV and WAV To MP3

This guide shows you how to convert from MP3 to WAV and WAV to MP3.

We are all used to converting from CD audio to MP3. (Actually younger people might not because they are used to downloading). The rest of us have a CD collection. This guide shows how to convert from CD audio to MP3.

Sometimes you want to convert from MP3 to WAV so that you can copy the songs to a CD for playing in the car. This guide shows how to do that as well.

76. 16 Ways To Beat Cryptolocker And Ransomware

Ransomware threatened to become a big thing a few years ago with ordinary users and large companies being forced to pay unethical conmen to get access to their own data after it was encrypted by nasty software. Pay up or never get your data back.

This guide provides 16 ways to beat Cryptolocker and Ransomware.

Posted at 21:30 |  by Gary Newell

Tuesday, 7 April 2015

Introduction

Last year I wrote a review of openSUSE 13.1 and I followed up the review with a series of articles looking at the applications that were released as part of the distribution:
That particular review looked at the KDE version of openSUSE. This is a review of openSUSE 13.2 and focuses on the GNOME desktop environment.

In my recent review of Fedora 21 I pointed out how far I believe the GNOME desktop has come in the past few years. I would go so far as saying that it is now so good that it is at least on a par with Unity and potentially the best desktop environment available.

The main desktop itself has excellent navigational features and keyboard shortcuts. GNOME 3 is more than just a pretty desktop. Look at this list of applications which are built to run on top of GNOME.

How To Get openSUSE 13.2

Click here for the openSUSE download page.

The initial download option on that page is 4.7 gigabytes in size. If you have a poor internet connection or a download limit that may seem extreme and to be honest you can guarantee that if you download that file then many of the applications will need to be updated after installing them anyway and you probably wouldn't use most of the software that makes up the 4.7 gigabytes.

Note that there is a link halfway down the page which reads "Click here to display these alternative versions". This option provides links to download a live GNOME and a live KDE version.

You can also buy a DVD or USB drive.

Minimum Requirements

This page on the openSUSE website lists the following minimum requirements.

  • Pentium III 500 mhz or higher (Pentium 4 2.4 ghz or any AMD64/Intel 64 recommended)
  • 1 GB RAM (2 GB recommended)
  • 3 GB Hard Drive space (5 GB or more recommended)
  • Supports most sound and graphics cards. (minimum 800 x 600 resolution, recommended 1024 x 768 or higher)
  • USB port or DVD drive

New Features In openSUSE 13.2

  • Linux Kernel 3.16
  • btrfs is new default filesystem
  • Live images are persistent by default
  • Revamped Yast installer (which I will come to shortly)
  • New Yast is faster, more stable and better integrated with SystemD
  • Latest stable version of KDE desktop available (4.11.12)
  • Newer GNOME desktop (3.14.1)
  • HiDPI Screen Support
  • Much improved searching in GNOME shell
  • Touch screen gestures supported
  • GNOME Maps includes route mapping
  • Google Account support for GNOME Photos
  • Playlist support in GNOME Music
  • New videos interface
  • Polari - a modern IRC client
Click here for a full list of new features in openSUSE 13.2 

Installation

I recently developed a guide showing how to install openSUSE whilst replacing your current operating system.

According to the new features list the YAST installer has been improved and in some areas this is true and in others I have a few issues.

The partitioning section is still just plain awful for the everyday user. I know it is easy to always fall back to the installers used by Ubuntu and Linux Mint but they do right what many other installers do wrong.

What is wrong with a simple "replace your current operating system with openSUSE" option which simply wipes your drive and sets up a sensible partitioning scheme?

What is wrong with a simple "install openSUSE alongside Windows" or "install openSUSE alongside your current operating system" option?

Instead, what you get is a long list of planned changes that the installer is going to make, which you have to work through and think about before moving on.

There is an option to enter a setup screen which lets you choose your hard drive and then select all partitions thereby replacing your current operating system with openSUSE but it isn't plainly in sight and even when you choose this option you are back to the big scary list showing dozens of potential partition changes.

Worse than that however, I previously had Fedora 21 on this drive which used an LVM partition. openSUSE couldn't handle replacing that with the partitioning structure I chose to set up. I ended up having to use gParted to remove the Fedora partitions and restart the installer.

There are people out there that will want all of the verbose options, giving access to every available installation option but maybe there could be a general installer and a custom installer to make it easier for the masses.

To be honest I found the openSUSE installer more difficult than the Anaconda installer that is shipped with Fedora and that has taken heaps of criticism over the years. Now I would say that the Fedora installer has greatly improved but the openSUSE installer still has some way to go.

On to the good news though, well kind of. This machine has a standard BIOS and there is no EFI in sight. The openSUSE installer actually throws up an error when installing the bootloader but there is an option to continue trying to set it up. If you choose to continue you are presented with the option to choose between GRUB 2 - EFI and plain old GRUB 2.

What this means of course is that the installer will work perfectly on older and newer computers. The GRUB 2 - EFI option even includes options for handling secure boot. Very good.

First Impressions





















The GNOME desktop is fairly typical although the choice of wallpaper for openSUSE is fairly dull.

GNOME has a panel at the top with the "Activities" option in the top left and a series of icons in the top right which provide access to power management, network settings and user settings.





















Pressing the super key or clicking on activities brings up the activities screen.

The screen basically has a search box in the top middle, a series of favourite applications icons on the left and access to virtual workspaces on the right. The workspaces hover in from the right when you move the mouse over to that section of the screen.

The favourite icons link to Firefox, Evolution, Empathy, Rhythmbox, Shotwell, LibreOffice and Files.

Pressing the super key and the A key brings up the applications view. Alternatively click on the bottom icon in the left bar.





















There are two views available which are frequent and all. Clicking the "all" option shows a grid with icons for all of your applications. As you can see from the screenshot the "frequent" option shows a handful of icons to applications used regularly.





















Navigation is particularly easy but it is worth learning all of the GNOME keyboard shortcuts.

The main thing I noticed about the openSUSE version of GNOME is that it performed much better than the Fedora version. The Fedora GNOME desktop performed better when I switched to GNOME Wayland. The trouble is that after switching to Wayland there were more errors and it was unpredictable at times. openSUSE however has performed well and has never crashed on me.



As mentioned previously the main wallpaper is fairly plain. To change the wallpaper all you have to do is right click on the desktop and choose "change background".

You are given the option to change the background for the main desktop or the lock screen.

The trouble is that there are no other wallpapers supplied with the live version of the GNOME desktop.

Luckily there was this cool invention made a while back now called the internet and an even cooler add-on to the internet called Google and after a little bit of searching you can do something like this.





















Flash and MP3

openSUSE is a community distribution (although it is backed by a larger corporation much like Ubuntu).

The upshot of this is that proprietary components such as MP3 codecs and Flash aren't installed by default.

You can install both of these options using 1 click installs. I have a guide coming up shortly showing how to do this.

Applications

I have never tried the full installation (4.7 gigabytes!) and so there maybe more applications installed by default with that version.

This review focuses on the live version with the GNOME desktop and as such the applications provided are as follows:

  • Aisleriot - solitaire card game
  • Brasero - disk burning software
  • Cheese - webcam viewer
  • Chess - chess game
  • Clocks - stopwatch, timer, world clock
  • Contacts - address book
  • Documents - pdf viewer
  • Empathy - chat client
  • Evolution - mail client
  • Files - file manager
  • Firefox - web browser
  • gedit - text editor
  • gimp - image editing tool
  • grsync - backup/syncing tool
  • lagno - game
  • k3b - disk burning software
  • libreoffice - office software (includes word processor, spreadsheet, presentation tool, drawing package etc)
  • liferea - RSS reader
  • lights off - game
  • Mahjongg - game
  • Maps - mapping tool
  • Midnight commander - file manager
  • Mines - game
  • Music - Gnome music player
  • Network tools
  • Notes - Note taking tool
  • Polari - chat client
  • Quadrapassel - game
  • Rhythmbox - audio player
  • Shotwell - photo manager
  • Sudoku - game
  • Swell foop - game
  • Transmission - bittorrent client
  • Totem - video player
There are quite a few applications really. There is certainly everything that the average person needs for basic homeworking and play with a full office suite, video players, audio players, photo managers, web browsers, chat clients and email clients.


I have written about Rhythmbox a number of times including a full recent review which can be found here.

I haven't however touched on the GNOME music player before which integrates nicely with the GNOME desktop.

There are a number of nice views available including by album, by artist, songs and playlists.

Creating playlists is relatively straight forward. You can either start selecting tracks and click the "Add to playlist" option or you can choose "Create a playlist" from the menu.

Whilst the interface is good it doesn't perform as well as Rhythmbox.





















The GNOME video player also integrates itself well to the GNOME desktop. There are options for playing local videos or searching online libraries such as Youtube and Vimeo.

Installing Applications

























There are a number of ways to install applications using openSUSE.

The first and most obvious way is to use the GNOME Packaging tool which can be found by typing "Software" into the search box within the activities window.

This tool is like the software centre within Ubuntu and boasts a search box, multiple categories, iconised views of applications, reviews and ratings.

The tool more commonly recognised for installing applications in openSUSE is YAST.

YAST is used for most configuration activities in openSUSE including security, setting up printers, scanners, sound and installing applications.

YAST can also set up and manage other software repositories including the non-free ones used for installing Flash and Java.

My main issue with YAST is the same as it has always been. I chose to install one application and it automatically added 300 megabytes worth of updates to the install without even warning me it was going to do so. Now I know that certain updates are important but it should be my choice when to update and at least a warning message should appear telling me that is going to happen.

The other way to install software in openSUSE is via the terminal window using a tool called zypper which is much like apt or yum.

Summary

openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, Mint. There isn't much between them now in terms of usability.

The openSUSE installer could do with a user friendly option (some people are going to disagree with this as they hate dumbing down) for replacing current operating systems and basic dual booting.

The main GNOME interface is very good and the GNOME tools such as the music player, weather application and video player integrate nicely.

The applications included with openSUSE are also very good. Most users will have everything they need to get going and the package managers will help install everything else.

Installing things like Flash, Steam and Skype require using 1-click installs (for everyday users) and the method for doing this can easily be found by searching using Google.

1-click installs could be dangerous security-wise if somebody decides to integrate something malicious into one of them. Users just have to be sensible about how they source their software and use the standard repositories as much as possible.

Stability is very good within openSUSE. I haven't experienced any notifications or errors whilst running openSUSE which is in complete contrast to Fedora which ran ok under the standard GNOME desktop (albeit a bit sluggish) but on the speedy Wayland version there were a number of big bangs.

All in all openSUSE is a good alternative to Ubuntu and Linux Mint. You just need to get it installed first.

Thankyou for reading.



An Everyday Linux Review Of openSUSE 13.2

Introduction

Last year I wrote a review of openSUSE 13.1 and I followed up the review with a series of articles looking at the applications that were released as part of the distribution:
That particular review looked at the KDE version of openSUSE. This is a review of openSUSE 13.2 and focuses on the GNOME desktop environment.

In my recent review of Fedora 21 I pointed out how far I believe the GNOME desktop has come in the past few years. I would go so far as saying that it is now so good that it is at least on a par with Unity and potentially the best desktop environment available.

The main desktop itself has excellent navigational features and keyboard shortcuts. GNOME 3 is more than just a pretty desktop. Look at this list of applications which are built to run on top of GNOME.

How To Get openSUSE 13.2

Click here for the openSUSE download page.

The initial download option on that page is 4.7 gigabytes in size. If you have a poor internet connection or a download limit that may seem extreme and to be honest you can guarantee that if you download that file then many of the applications will need to be updated after installing them anyway and you probably wouldn't use most of the software that makes up the 4.7 gigabytes.

Note that there is a link halfway down the page which reads "Click here to display these alternative versions". This option provides links to download a live GNOME and a live KDE version.

You can also buy a DVD or USB drive.

Minimum Requirements

This page on the openSUSE website lists the following minimum requirements.

  • Pentium III 500 mhz or higher (Pentium 4 2.4 ghz or any AMD64/Intel 64 recommended)
  • 1 GB RAM (2 GB recommended)
  • 3 GB Hard Drive space (5 GB or more recommended)
  • Supports most sound and graphics cards. (minimum 800 x 600 resolution, recommended 1024 x 768 or higher)
  • USB port or DVD drive

New Features In openSUSE 13.2

  • Linux Kernel 3.16
  • btrfs is new default filesystem
  • Live images are persistent by default
  • Revamped Yast installer (which I will come to shortly)
  • New Yast is faster, more stable and better integrated with SystemD
  • Latest stable version of KDE desktop available (4.11.12)
  • Newer GNOME desktop (3.14.1)
  • HiDPI Screen Support
  • Much improved searching in GNOME shell
  • Touch screen gestures supported
  • GNOME Maps includes route mapping
  • Google Account support for GNOME Photos
  • Playlist support in GNOME Music
  • New videos interface
  • Polari - a modern IRC client
Click here for a full list of new features in openSUSE 13.2 

Installation

I recently developed a guide showing how to install openSUSE whilst replacing your current operating system.

According to the new features list the YAST installer has been improved and in some areas this is true and in others I have a few issues.

The partitioning section is still just plain awful for the everyday user. I know it is easy to always fall back to the installers used by Ubuntu and Linux Mint but they do right what many other installers do wrong.

What is wrong with a simple "replace your current operating system with openSUSE" option which simply wipes your drive and sets up a sensible partitioning scheme?

What is wrong with a simple "install openSUSE alongside Windows" or "install openSUSE alongside your current operating system" option?

Instead, what you get is a long list of planned changes that the installer is going to make, which you have to work through and think about before moving on.

There is an option to enter a setup screen which lets you choose your hard drive and then select all partitions thereby replacing your current operating system with openSUSE but it isn't plainly in sight and even when you choose this option you are back to the big scary list showing dozens of potential partition changes.

Worse than that however, I previously had Fedora 21 on this drive which used an LVM partition. openSUSE couldn't handle replacing that with the partitioning structure I chose to set up. I ended up having to use gParted to remove the Fedora partitions and restart the installer.

There are people out there that will want all of the verbose options, giving access to every available installation option but maybe there could be a general installer and a custom installer to make it easier for the masses.

To be honest I found the openSUSE installer more difficult than the Anaconda installer that is shipped with Fedora and that has taken heaps of criticism over the years. Now I would say that the Fedora installer has greatly improved but the openSUSE installer still has some way to go.

On to the good news though, well kind of. This machine has a standard BIOS and there is no EFI in sight. The openSUSE installer actually throws up an error when installing the bootloader but there is an option to continue trying to set it up. If you choose to continue you are presented with the option to choose between GRUB 2 - EFI and plain old GRUB 2.

What this means of course is that the installer will work perfectly on older and newer computers. The GRUB 2 - EFI option even includes options for handling secure boot. Very good.

First Impressions





















The GNOME desktop is fairly typical although the choice of wallpaper for openSUSE is fairly dull.

GNOME has a panel at the top with the "Activities" option in the top left and a series of icons in the top right which provide access to power management, network settings and user settings.





















Pressing the super key or clicking on activities brings up the activities screen.

The screen basically has a search box in the top middle, a series of favourite applications icons on the left and access to virtual workspaces on the right. The workspaces hover in from the right when you move the mouse over to that section of the screen.

The favourite icons link to Firefox, Evolution, Empathy, Rhythmbox, Shotwell, LibreOffice and Files.

Pressing the super key and the A key brings up the applications view. Alternatively click on the bottom icon in the left bar.





















There are two views available which are frequent and all. Clicking the "all" option shows a grid with icons for all of your applications. As you can see from the screenshot the "frequent" option shows a handful of icons to applications used regularly.





















Navigation is particularly easy but it is worth learning all of the GNOME keyboard shortcuts.

The main thing I noticed about the openSUSE version of GNOME is that it performed much better than the Fedora version. The Fedora GNOME desktop performed better when I switched to GNOME Wayland. The trouble is that after switching to Wayland there were more errors and it was unpredictable at times. openSUSE however has performed well and has never crashed on me.



As mentioned previously the main wallpaper is fairly plain. To change the wallpaper all you have to do is right click on the desktop and choose "change background".

You are given the option to change the background for the main desktop or the lock screen.

The trouble is that there are no other wallpapers supplied with the live version of the GNOME desktop.

Luckily there was this cool invention made a while back now called the internet and an even cooler add-on to the internet called Google and after a little bit of searching you can do something like this.





















Flash and MP3

openSUSE is a community distribution (although it is backed by a larger corporation much like Ubuntu).

The upshot of this is that proprietary components such as MP3 codecs and Flash aren't installed by default.

You can install both of these options using 1 click installs. I have a guide coming up shortly showing how to do this.

Applications

I have never tried the full installation (4.7 gigabytes!) and so there maybe more applications installed by default with that version.

This review focuses on the live version with the GNOME desktop and as such the applications provided are as follows:

  • Aisleriot - solitaire card game
  • Brasero - disk burning software
  • Cheese - webcam viewer
  • Chess - chess game
  • Clocks - stopwatch, timer, world clock
  • Contacts - address book
  • Documents - pdf viewer
  • Empathy - chat client
  • Evolution - mail client
  • Files - file manager
  • Firefox - web browser
  • gedit - text editor
  • gimp - image editing tool
  • grsync - backup/syncing tool
  • lagno - game
  • k3b - disk burning software
  • libreoffice - office software (includes word processor, spreadsheet, presentation tool, drawing package etc)
  • liferea - RSS reader
  • lights off - game
  • Mahjongg - game
  • Maps - mapping tool
  • Midnight commander - file manager
  • Mines - game
  • Music - Gnome music player
  • Network tools
  • Notes - Note taking tool
  • Polari - chat client
  • Quadrapassel - game
  • Rhythmbox - audio player
  • Shotwell - photo manager
  • Sudoku - game
  • Swell foop - game
  • Transmission - bittorrent client
  • Totem - video player
There are quite a few applications really. There is certainly everything that the average person needs for basic homeworking and play with a full office suite, video players, audio players, photo managers, web browsers, chat clients and email clients.


I have written about Rhythmbox a number of times including a full recent review which can be found here.

I haven't however touched on the GNOME music player before which integrates nicely with the GNOME desktop.

There are a number of nice views available including by album, by artist, songs and playlists.

Creating playlists is relatively straight forward. You can either start selecting tracks and click the "Add to playlist" option or you can choose "Create a playlist" from the menu.

Whilst the interface is good it doesn't perform as well as Rhythmbox.





















The GNOME video player also integrates itself well to the GNOME desktop. There are options for playing local videos or searching online libraries such as Youtube and Vimeo.

Installing Applications

























There are a number of ways to install applications using openSUSE.

The first and most obvious way is to use the GNOME Packaging tool which can be found by typing "Software" into the search box within the activities window.

This tool is like the software centre within Ubuntu and boasts a search box, multiple categories, iconised views of applications, reviews and ratings.

The tool more commonly recognised for installing applications in openSUSE is YAST.

YAST is used for most configuration activities in openSUSE including security, setting up printers, scanners, sound and installing applications.

YAST can also set up and manage other software repositories including the non-free ones used for installing Flash and Java.

My main issue with YAST is the same as it has always been. I chose to install one application and it automatically added 300 megabytes worth of updates to the install without even warning me it was going to do so. Now I know that certain updates are important but it should be my choice when to update and at least a warning message should appear telling me that is going to happen.

The other way to install software in openSUSE is via the terminal window using a tool called zypper which is much like apt or yum.

Summary

openSUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, Mint. There isn't much between them now in terms of usability.

The openSUSE installer could do with a user friendly option (some people are going to disagree with this as they hate dumbing down) for replacing current operating systems and basic dual booting.

The main GNOME interface is very good and the GNOME tools such as the music player, weather application and video player integrate nicely.

The applications included with openSUSE are also very good. Most users will have everything they need to get going and the package managers will help install everything else.

Installing things like Flash, Steam and Skype require using 1-click installs (for everyday users) and the method for doing this can easily be found by searching using Google.

1-click installs could be dangerous security-wise if somebody decides to integrate something malicious into one of them. Users just have to be sensible about how they source their software and use the standard repositories as much as possible.

Stability is very good within openSUSE. I haven't experienced any notifications or errors whilst running openSUSE which is in complete contrast to Fedora which ran ok under the standard GNOME desktop (albeit a bit sluggish) but on the speedy Wayland version there were a number of big bangs.

All in all openSUSE is a good alternative to Ubuntu and Linux Mint. You just need to get it installed first.

Thankyou for reading.



Posted at 23:51 |  by Gary Newell

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